03 January 2021

Letters from Levi Yitzkhak Lederman, 9 August 1911

This post continues translation from Yiddish and analysis of letters sent by Levi Yitzkhak Liderman to his son, Morris, who was settled, initially, in New York City in 1910. For further background, see the first post in this series


For links to other posts in this series, scroll to the bottom.

As noted previously, translation is an art. Any comments or clarifications by Yiddish speakers/translators are welcome.


=====MECHANICAL=====
Cast-iron foundry
"Shuriev"
Polonnoe, Volinskiy Gub.
 
Wednesday, 9 August English 1911

[This letter was sent inside an envelope that has not survived.]

Translation

Translation by Esther Chanie Dushinsky

[Notes in blue as well as those at the end of the post are mine. For ease of reading, I have added paragraph breaks in the translation.]

[Side 1]

My sweet and loving son Mr. Moshe-Shalom-Mordekhai

My dear and loving son...

I received your closed letter from 19 July English on the 4th of August English. I was very happy to read your _____ words that you will give thanks that you are starting seeing _____ in life and Tachlis.

And what is this, my son, that you found some pressure in the slur word that I wrote in my previous letter that I wrote the word "Busiuk."[1] God forbid that I should write such a negative word. I asked what the reason was that you needed to leave [or ruin] your apartment with your uncle, and that according to my opinion, your actions weren't good. But curse words, God forbid...

My son, in your previous card, before this one, you write some words that contradict every single one of your previous letters. You wrote these words: "It is a year since I am in America and I didn't accomplish anything." The entire time before that, you wrote that it is very good for you there. Do you know ____ [why]?

You write that you have given Avraham Abba's letter to Mottel'n.[2] What is going on with that? Why can't you send Mottel's address? I have asked you to send his address, and I will give Avraham Abba's, as _____ [they?] were emphatic that _____ the address isn't correct. They write and write and do not get a response. 

Moshe'leh, I am sending you an address of someone Shalom Shechtman. He is in New York already, and is traveling home. I happened to have been these days at his father's, "Abba [?] Schechtman." They know me very well in their home, _____ [we come over to complete prayers?]. They told me that their son Shalom is in America and is traveling home already, and one of these days he will be traveling from New York. Find him and go

[Side 2]

ask him if it is true. I gather that you might know him. I also saw his wife and she even told me that she will write to him about it.

From our Zavle'n I haven't heard any news to write. I haven't received any letters from him. That's because he still doesn't have anything to do. It is time that God should have mercy on him and life his mazel [luck].

There is thank God no news from us. Mother, should live, is alone in Anipoli with Sarah'n, in Anipoli.[3] I am here. There is no buyer for the home yet. There is one buyer from the"Maladekes," but wants to pay half price. 

Two weeks ago, I traveled through Baranovka to Faiga'n, and I stayed there overnight. She is complaining a lot that you don't write to her. I can't thank God about their health. Indeed, I can't understand you, and what happened to you that you don't write to her? Bottom line, she is _____ [sad?]. 

You write to me that the uncle and aunt have complained why I haven't written to them.[4] I believe that in every letter I sent greetings, and I haven't received a single good response from them. I sent a card to him not too long ago and I did not get any response. I will write to him again.

There is no more news. From your father who worries about you, and is asking for your success.

Notes

1. босяк [bosyak] in Russian and Ukrainian means either "tramp' or someone who is down and out. Several Yiddish translators have told me that Levi Yitzkhak's handwriting is difficult to read. In addition, he sometimes included Russian words written in Hebrew letters. Apparently, Moshe must have misunderstood something his father wrote in his letter of 21 June 1911 regarding Moshe's move from his uncle, Jacob Simberg's, home. 

2. This is a continuation of a discussion about my great uncle, Mottel (Max) Garber, and his parents (my great grandparents, Avraham Abba and Khana). Avraham Abba and Khana had been sending letters to Mottel but had not been receiving letters in return. See correspondence of 21 June 1911 and 5 August 1911


Lol! I have had trouble locating Mottel during this time period, too! Motel arrived in NY in 1908. I have located him with his wife Mary, whom he married in 1914 (in 1914 living at 201 E. 2nd Street), and his brother, Jacob (my grandfather) at 171 101st Street, NY, NY, in the 1915 New York census. He has escaped detection in the 1910 U.S. enumeration, I think. I have located a 1910 census record for someone recorded as Max Langer (or Lauger), a 22 year old egg candler and immigrant from Russia. He was a boarder at 377 E. 10th Street, NY, NY in the 1910 Census. Except for the surname (which might have been copied over incorrectly by a census superviser), this fits with what we know of Max Garber: he'd arrived before the 1910 census, was born about 1889 and was an egg candler at this point in his working career. He was living with the Max Weisser family. More research is needed to determine if this was my Max (Mottel). 1910 U.S. Census, NY County, NY, pop. sched., Manhattan, e.d. 1671, sheet 16B, dwell. 18, fam. 297, Max Langer; images, Ancestry.com; NARA microfilm pub. T624, roll 1012.

3. The family lived in Annopol, Ostrog Uyezd, Volhynia Gubernia. 

4. Uncle and aunt were Jacob Simberg and his wife Anna Prulman Simberg. Jacob was the brother of Moshe's mother Frieda Simberg Lederman. Jacob was from the community of Lyubar and arrived in the USA in 1899. Manifest, S.S. Konigin Luise, Bremen to NY, arrived 30 July 1899, page 225 [stamped], line 28, Jankel Sinberg, age 35; images, Ancestry.com; NARA microfilm publication T715, roll 76.

Posts in This Series

06 December 2020

Letters from Levi Yitzkhak Lederman, 05 August 1911

This post continues translation from Yiddish and analysis of letters sent by Levi Yitzkhak Liderman to his son, Morris, who was settled, initially, in New York City in 1910. For further background, see the first post in this series

I have included a small family tree at the end of the post.
 
For links to other posts in this series, scroll to the bottom.

As noted previously, translation is an art. Any comments or clarifications by Yiddish speakers/translators are welcome.


Postmark

5 August 1911, Annopol, Vol. [Volhynia Gubernia]

[This is the Julian calendar date, which was in effect in the Russian Empire at this time. The letter was written two days earlier than posted, on Wednesday, 3 August. The equivalent in the Gregorian calendar (in use in the United States, then and now) was 16 August 1911. The Hebrew calendar date was 22 Av 5671. As noted in the beginning of the text, the Torah reading for the week was Re'eh. ]

Addressed to:

Mr. B. Simberg
E. 82nd Street
New York City
for Liderman
U.S. of America 

[This address did not include a house number. It is a mystery how it made its way to Morris! In a small town such an address would likely suffice. But in New York City?!?
 
Previous cards had been sent to Morris care of J. Simberg, Morris' uncle Jacob. This one was sent to B. Simberg, likely Jacob's son, Benjamin. However, I have located no other records showing Benjamin at this address.[1]]

Translation

Translation by Esther Chanie Dushinsky

[Notes in blue as well as those at the end of the post are mine. Levi Yitzkhak tried to squeeze as much on the card as possible and did not break the text into paragraphs. For ease of reading, I have added paragraph breaks in the translation.]

[Side 1]

Wednesday, Parshas Re'eh, August 16 English, 1911, Anopol

My dear, beloved son Mr. Moshe-Shalom, should live,

I am currently home and traveled for two days. Happens to be, I already received your closed letter, as well as your card from the eve to Tish B'av [9 Av], the second of August in English.[2] I also received on yesterday, August 15 in English. I was very happy to read your lines, but the news in the card of your troubles made me sad, and it rang in our ears. Especially mother, should live, she cried.

You ask when your time is with the [prizev] [Russian word, призыв, means military draft], and we should write to you of our opinion about the [prisev] [draft]. We discussed it amongst ourselves to try to understand what you mean by that. And the bottom line of your words was that after we write our opinion to you, you will then write what you think about it. And so, my dear son, I will hurry and move forward and wish you as it's written.

First write to us, what is this news that you suddenly brought? I will ask you a question that you brought forth [?] because _____ "Why did it change," but in spite of all this, I will respond _____ that your [prisev] [period of being subject to the draft?] is 2 years, meaning the year 1913.[3] And I will go to Polonnoe and the ____ [hoprova] to _____ well and will write a second time. 

We are asking and crying to God. I wish we should still see each other in this life. You should be a Jew [Yid] and be freed from non Jewish heroes and we should see much nakhas from you with our own eyes and we should have the merit to bring you pleasure. And my son, say Amen.

[Right margin] 

From your card, I am writing Faiga'n, Zeidel'n.

[Upside down] 

Moshe - nu, why don't you write to Faiga'n, Shachna'n a single letter?[4] They are kind of angry at you. 

[Side 2] 

I received a letter from Mottel'n.[5] He excuses himself that he, from his side is behaving correctly, but Nachum'n is at fault. And the _____[letter?] that was sent to _____ Avraham Abba, there is no letter. The entire time he sent one letter and he has no ____ is waiting that he should have _____

...brother in law received your letter.[6] I am blessing you to be loved/accepted, and many thanks. I am wishing you and your wife and children happiness. _____ to my beloved and sweet son Moshe'leh. Moshe'leh _____ Neshama. Give honor to my son _____ Moshe. Moshe'leh, it's worth it to honor and serve. God should help him, amen. Freidel will write a letter to you one of these days. Greet [?] the honorable father Moshe'leh [?].

[Upside down]

Yakov Baba, Baba Yakov, children, watch over our jewel, our diamond Moshe'leh, I don't think _____, another. You have the mitzvah of your own flesh and blood, such gold. Sadly, he is far away from his parents, overseas. Other than this, woe unto us. 

Yakov Baba... In this merit, we are wishing you that your should be healthy and have nakhas from your children. 

Also Yosef, if you can see if it could be better for him. He should be able to work at a better job [?].[7] It is more than a year sine he got to America, and there is no point in that whatever he earns is used on himself right away. And what are his expenses? I have him _____ cash. I am greeting you, my dear, _____ I and my wife, your only sister Breindel [? or Freida, but it looks like Breindel] and our Sarah'leh.[8] Everyone wants to know how you are doing and thank you that _____ [cut off on bottom].


[Left margin]

Do good, you have the opportunity.

Notes

1. In 1910, Benjamin, age 20, lived with his parents and siblings at 55 Broome Street, NY, NY. He worked as a clerk at, perhaps, a drug store. Based upon the post cards to Morris Liderman sent care of the Simbergs, they lived at 55 Broome into February 1911 (this is the last postcard sent to Broome Street). Sometime in February, they moved to 134-136 Cannon Street (see this post). I have not found city directories that included Simberg family members. By the 1915 New York State census, the Simbergs had moved to the Bronx and lived at 1428 Crotona Park East. For their 1910 address, see 1910 U.S. Census, NY Co., pop. sched., Manhattan, e.d. 781, sheet 10A, dwell. 11, fam. 188, Jacob and Anna Simberg family; images, Ancestry; NARA  microfilm pub. T624, roll 1029. The family was recorded in June in the 1915 New York State census, Bronx Co., NY, enumeration of inhabitants, the Bronx. A.D. 34, e.d. 33, p. 19, Jacob and Anna Simberg family; images, Ancestry; citing New York State Archives, Albany.

2.  There were several pieces of correspondence that were letters rather than postcards. The letters, enclosed in an envelope and not available for prying eyes, were sent when Moshe/Morris and his parents felt the need to speak freely and confidentially.

3. Russian laws required that men complete their military service before they could be approved for emigration. "The family of a Jew who has evaded the fulfillment of his military duties will have to pay a fine of 300 rubles." Since Morris was inquiring about when he was to be called for military service, it seems he had not completed military service in the Czar's army. If this was the case, then his departure from Russia was not done legally. (for further information about the Russian requirements for military service among Jews, see United States, Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization, Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury, transmitting a report of the Commissioners of Immigration upon the causes which incite immigration to the United States (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1892); images, Internet Archive (https://archive.org/details/letterfromsecret00unit_0/page/n6/mode/1up )

4. Feiga, Moshe's older sister, was married to Shalom Shakhna Grinfeld. They lived in Baranovka with their three children.

5. In his letter of  21 June 1911, Levi Yitzkhak asked his son to contact Mottel Garber (Levi Yitzkhak's nephew/Moshe's 1st cousin) about the fraught relationship between Mottel and his brother Nukhim and their parents, Avraham Aba and Khana Garber. In response to Levi Yitzkhak's pleas, Mottel sent his uncle a letter trying to explain the situation. From this letter from Levi Yitzkhak, it appears that Motel blamed the intra-family problems on his brother, Nakhum. 

Motel (max) and Nakhum (Nathan) Garber were my great uncles: my grandfather Jack's brothers.

6. Levi Yitzkhak's brother-in-law was Jacob Simberg, later referred to as Yakov in this card.  

7. Thus far I have not been able to determine who Yosef was. I have not located a Joseph Simberg in New York. 

8. In prior post cards, Frieda (Moshe's mother/Levi Yitzkhak's wife) was identified as Jacob Simberg's only sister. So, the name noted here must be Frieda. Sarah was Levi Yitzkhak and Frieda's daughter.

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14 September 2020

Letters from Levi Yitzkhak Lederman, 21 June 1911

Between July 1910 and April 1914, Morris Lederman received  about 37 cards/letters from his parents in Volhynia Gubernia. Many are mundane - sending love and begging for as much correspondence as possible. Certainly those of us who have been apart from our family members understand the sentiments. Some of the letters are plaintive. Many of these 37 cards and letters remind us of the backstory of this time in eastern Europe before WWI: the difficult social and economic conditions and how that affected so many families. These are testament to the troubling times in which our families tried to survive.
 
Levi Yitzkhak's letters were filled with concern for his youngest son, Moshe (Morris), in America and for his other son, Zaidel (Zanvel), who had not been able to find work in Russia. Zaidel was promised a job in Ekaterinoslav (now Dnipro, Ukraine), about 475 miles east southeast from home in Annopol, but had trouble raising the funds for travel. In this letter there was some good news: Moshe had been able to send his older brother money. Zaidel was finally able to travel.
 
Then, Levi Yitzkhak tried to intercede in his brother's, Avraham Abba's, family troubles. Avraham Abba was my great grandfather and Khana , his wife, was my great grandmother. Their sons mentioned in this letter - Nakhum (the oldest) and Mottel (the second son) - were my great uncles.
 
The letter translated here blew me apart. Imagine sending one's child away with little or no prospect of seeing them again. Then, think of how difficult communication was more than 100 years ago. These people were completely dependent on an international mail system that took weeks for delivery and sometimes failed them completely. They struggled to write addresses in unfamiliar alphabets. There were no other choices for communication.
One can easily picture how long-distance relationships could fray.
 
This post continues translation from Yiddish and analysis of letters sent by Levi Yitzkhak Liderman to his son, Morris, who was settled, initially, in New York City in 1910. For further background, see the first post in this series

I have included a small family tree at the end of the post.
 
For links to other posts in this series, scroll to the bottom.

As noted previously, translation is an art. Any comments or clarifications by Yiddish speakers/translators are welcome.


This correspondence was in a letter rather than a postcard. No envelope had been saved. We know that Levi Yitzkhak was still working away from home (Annopol) in Polonnoe from the text of the letter, itself.

Levi Yitzkhak did not include the year along with the date of the letter (4 July). He did, however, include the parshas - the Torah reading for the week: Chukas Balak. I checked on Hebcal.org and found that Chukas Balak had to have been read on 4 July 1911 rather than in the any of the following years of 1912, 1913 or 1914. 

Translation

Translation by Esther Chanie Dushinsky

[Notes in blue as well as those at the end of the post are mine. As on his postcards, Levi Yitzkhak tried to squeeze as much on the paper as possible and did not often break the text into paragraphs. For ease of reading, I have added my own paragraph breaks in the translation.]

[Side 1]

Chukas Balak

Tuesday, 21 June [Russian], 4 July [English]

My Dear and Beloved son, dear to my soul, Mr. Moshe Shalom Mordekhai,

I received your letters, meaning, your cards that you sent home [Annopol], as well as what you sent directly to me in Polonnoe at the address Itzek Benis [written in Russian alphabet].[1] Mother, should live, also sent the letters that you sent to her. The wishes that mother and I have wished for you should be fulfilled. Quite a while has passed, and we haven't received letters from you and we were beside ourselves. I wrote to mother, and she wrote to me, asking one another whether either of us received anything from you. Bottom line, thank God we received the cards from you. We thank our beloved God for your health. God should give that we should continue to hear the same from you, amen.

Moshe'leh, I must write to you that I have been thinking about for a while already, and I don't even know what. You keep on writing very, very short cards and you wrote nothing about your day to day activities, who you spend time with, and where. And on top of that, you are now writing from a different address.[2] You write that you moved to a different place. I have a feeling that there's a reason for this. Even though you wrote that the reason you moved is because your shop is too far from the uncle's home. But I think something else happened, because in my opinion, it isn't straight-forward. Firstly, I gather that you were treated well there, and yet, the children, you most likely lived quite well. Simply put, it cost you less, for example food, sleeping arrangements and living space, etc. And most importantly, the uncle and aunt most likely watched over you, considering that you are their only sister's child. And yet, I gather you are a child that is used to - as they say - "in the mother's apron." So, my dear son, write a long letter to me, in detail about everything. Let me know what's going on with you. Where and to whom did you move, and the honest truth as to what brought you to do this. If, my dear son, something happened to you, even more so. As it says, "ask your father and he will tell you." Write to me with heart and soul [? center fold of letter] and answer. I am depending on you.

A few _____[two letters?] from Shalom Nachum, Mottel, Reuven last week Tuesday. Meaning, the second day Rosh Chodesh Tamuz, the 27th of June [?] English.[3] Staying at my brother Avraham Abba.[4] I had to take care of some business. When they saw me, they asked and cried to me, begged and pleaded with a broken heart [?]. Meaning, Mottel, Nachum - Nachum, Mottel - Moshe'leh, your Moshe'leh. Nachum, since he's in America he hasn't sent them even one letter. To Mottel'n [?] he writes a letter every week and to them he doesn't even send a greeting. Mottel they tell me, sent them a letter after Pesach, and wrote, "Father, Mother, Mother, Father," look at my handwriting, because you won't see letters from me anymore. As they were sharing this story, everyone started crying. Avraham Abba, Khana and the children cried bitter tears, asking with great sighs, "What is my sin?" What happened? [5] Mottel says that because they haven't sent letters to him for a long while. But they swear that they did send a letter to him, but it seems that the address wasn't written correctly and, therefore, Mottel didn't receive the letters. 

Now Avraham Abba gave me a letter from them, that I should add it to the letter I am now writing. They ask that you should be the middleman and give it to Mottel, and Mottel should see to it that from today onward, he should send to the correct address. But please send Mottel's address to me and I will forward it. But you see to it that you chastise Mottel that one doesn't do such things. Why do they nebech deserve such pain?[6]

Mottel, Mottel, I always hope for a good ____. Why would you do such things to your parents, give them pain and heartache? Why do they nebech deserve it? Father and Mother nebech cried bitter tears to me. Even if a father and mother do wrong sometimes, the child still has to judge them favorably. Especially as they swear that they are not at fault. That some bad luck got involved here, that the address was wrong. All the more, I think that a child has to share their pleasures with their parents as much as possible and you are giving them such troubles. I am asking that you do this for my sake and write a letter to them. Write to me as well about your life, about your day to day. Write about my diamond, Moshe'leh. Moshe'leh will write to me about you. If you are living in peace and love and friendship.

[Side 2]

Moshe'leh, Moshe'leh, I wrote to you about Zaidl'en that he traveled to Ekaterinoslav and I haven't received a letter from him about how he's doing. I hope that God will help that he should find something. It is time that God should have mercy on him and our luck should get better. We should merit nackhas.[7] Amen. 

From your father who wants to know how you are doing and worries about you and prays for you, and hopes for your good. _____

See Moshe'leh, give the letter to Avraham Abba's Mottel'n and tell Mottel'n to him, to Nachum'n. And write to me about everything.

I see in your cards that you take an additional $7.50 for _____ cards. I am reading that in America they don't have _____ a few dollars isn't good [?]. You responded that you had to help Zaidl'en, and it is indeed the _____ you write that you don't have. Bottom line is that I know you and you are not a _____. Meaning, you don't lie, God forbid [?]. I am asking that you should write about everything. The truth, truth, truth.

They tell me at Avraham Abba's that those that travel to America, change. Meaning, who is greater than Moshe'leh? He promised and promised that he will write the honest truth and at the end he doesn't write. One becomes a different person. Why are you silent, Moshe'leh?

Moshe'leh, I will sign this letter. I received the letter from home in the evening on the _____ [page is torn] and _____ [torn] at mother's, should live. She received a card from Zaidel'n on last week Wednesday. He writes that _____ [torn] nothing. He writes that he arrived and found a guest house [?] where _____ [transliterated as sluzashtshe; probably слузаще, meaning "on occasion." So, Zaidel could stay there occasionally.] stay there. And they tell him that he should try from his end. God should help with the best. Mother nebech can't calm down this time as well, because she hasn't received a letter from you.

The address for Zaidel

Екатеринославь [Yekaterinoslav]

Крестовая Ул. [Krestovaya Street]

Конопенко Кв. Фраина [Konopenko Kv. Fraina]

Лидерманв [Liderman] 

Moshe'leh, write to him, perhaps a card. I ask him to write to you. 

Notes: 

1. This looks like a name to me: Itzek Benis. [Ицеку Бенису]

2. Moshe (Morris) had been living with his uncle (his mother's brother) and aunt, Jacob and Hannah (Anna) Simberg, at 134-136 Cannon Street, New York, New York.

3. Rosh Chodesh is the beginning of the Hebrew month. In the case of the month of Tamuz, Rosh Chodesh is two days: the last day of the previous month (Sivan) and the first day of Tamuz. So, in 1911, 1 Tamuz was the 27th of June.

4. Avraham Abba Garber and his wife Khana Matsevitski lived in the community of Labun (today called Yurovshchina, Ukraine). By June of 1911, two of their sons had emigrated and lived in Manhattan: Nachum (Nathan) and Mottel (Max). Mottel immigrated in December 1907 and Nachum in June 1910, just a few weeks before his first cousin Moshe Lederman (in August 1910). My grandfather, Jankel (Jack) - their third son - immigrated in September 1912.

5. The Garber children living at home in Labun at that time  were (in age order) Perl, Sarah, Jankel, Feiga and Aron.

6. Nebech is a Yiddish interjection meaning "you poor thing!" - an unfortunate person.

7. Nachas is Yiddish for joy or blessings from pride in (usually) one's children's accomplishments.

 


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Posts in This Series

07 September 2020

Letters from Levi Yitzkhak Lederman, 27 May 1911

This post continues translation from Yiddish and analysis of letters sent by Levi Yitzkhak Liderman to his son, Morris, who was settled, initially, in New York City in 1910. For further background, see the first post in this series

For links to other posts in this series, scroll to the bottom.

As noted previously, translation is an art. Any comments or clarifications by Yiddish speakers/translators are welcome.

Postmark

27 May 1911, Polonnoe, Wol. [Volhynia Gubernia]

[This is the Julian calendar date, which was in effect in the Russian Empire at this time. The letter was posted the same day it was written. The equivalent in the Gregorian calendar (in use in the United States, then and now) was 9 June 1911.]

Addressed to:

Mr. J. Simberg
134-136 Cannon Street
New York
U.S. of America
for Morris Lederman

Translation

Translation by Esther Chanie Dushinsky

[Notes in blue as well as those at the end of the post are mine. Levi Yitzkhak tried to squeeze as much on the card as possible and did not break the text into paragraphs. For ease of reading, I have added paragraph breaks in the translation.]

[Side 1]

Friday eve of Shabbos, Naso, 9 June English, 27 May Russian [1]

My dear and beloved son, as precious as my soul, Mr. Moshe-Shalom-Mordekhai, should live.

This past week on Friday, on the eve of Shevuos, I received your letter from home.[2] And today, here in Polonnoe _____ I came back here on Monday and found a letter from you. I am reading your _____ [outcry?] that you haven't received a letter from me. And it is surprising to me and all of us that you didn't receive a letter, not the one from mother _____ _____ [looks like a name that starts with F/P, but it's indecipherable]. I hope that you get the letters soon, there is no other possibility, other than that the letters were held up on the way. _____ not allow any _____.

There is no _____, and has nothing to add, and the new _____ and will wake up and Zanvel [?] will manage to travel to Ekaterinoslav - didn't I express in the previous letters that _____, most likely there won't be _____. God should help that it should be for the best. Sadly, he hasn't traveled yet, he is waiting an address that should get to him from there.[3]

Aside from Toba's groom, meaning Gittele's groom, he received more protektzia [preferential treatment due to some connections] there, from someone we know, and we hope that God will help and something will work out. The truth is that Zanvel is a capable person. He isn't a lost cause. Most likely God will have mercy and something will work out for the best.

[Side 2]

Moshe'leh, what's the story as to why you started writing very shortly? You don't write about what your job is, you don't write whether you earn enough or not, you don't write about how you spend your days. Write, write, my child, your _____ [writing is faded at the fold of the paper], your leisure time. 

And what about Reuven? You haven't written about him? Did he get married? With whom and where?[4]

Bottom line, my son, my son, write, write. I slept here, I ate here, I spent my time here.

Your father who worries about you _____

Send regards to my brother in law in my name.[5] 

Notes:

1. The Torah reading for Naso is Numbers 4:21–7:89. The Hebrew date of this card was 13 Sivan 5671.

2. Home was in Annopol, Ostrog District. Shavuos, a two-day observance, started at sundown on Thursday, 19 May 1911 (Julian calendar) and 1 June in 1911 (Gregorian calendar). It is called the "Feast of Weeks" or the Pentecost. It marks the time when the Jews received the Torah on Mount Sinai.

3. In the previous letter (postmarked 21 May 1911), Levi Yitzkhak  mentioned that someone named Gittel, daughter of Toba, was engaged and her future husband, a successful businessman said he could help Zanvel, Levi Yitzkhak's older son, find work in Ekaterinislav. 

4. In his letter postmarked 11 May 1911, Levi Yitzkhak mentioned Reuben to whom he'd written a letter that had been returned probably because the address was incorrect. I noted in that post that I was working on the possibility that Reuben was Reuben Resnick. See note 4 on that post.

5. Levi Yitzkhak's brother-in-law was his wife's brother, Jacob Simberg.

~~~~~~~~~~~

Posts in This Series