14 September 2020

Letters from Levi Yitzkhak Lederman, 21 June 1911

Between July 1910 and April 1914, Morris Lederman received  about 37 cards/letters from his parents in Volhynia Gubernia. Many are mundane - sending love and begging for as much correspondence as possible. Certainly those of us who have been apart from our family members understand the sentiments. Some of the letters are plaintive. Many of these 37 cards and letters remind us of the backstory of this time in eastern Europe before WWI: the difficult social and economic conditions and how that affected so many families. These are testament to the troubling times in which our families tried to survive.
 
Levi Yitzkhak's letters were filled with concern for his youngest son, Moshe (Morris), in America and for his other son, Zaidel (Zanvel), who had not been able to find work in Russia. Zaidel was promised a job in Ekaterinoslav (now Dnipro, Ukraine), about 475 miles east southeast from home in Annopol, but had trouble raising the funds for travel. In this letter there was some good news: Moshe had been able to send his older brother money. Zaidel was finally able to travel.
 
Then, Levi Yitzkhak tried to intercede in his brother's, Avraham Abba's, family troubles. Avraham Abba was my great grandfather and Khana , his wife, was my great grandmother. Their sons mentioned in this letter - Nakhum (the oldest) and Mottel (the second son) - were my great uncles.
 
The letter translated here blew me apart. Imagine sending one's child away with little or no prospect of seeing them again. Then, think of how difficult communication was more than 100 years ago. These people were completely dependent on an international mail system that took weeks for delivery and sometimes failed them completely. They struggled to write addresses in unfamiliar alphabets. There were no other choices for communication.
One can easily picture how long-distance relationships could fray.
 
This post continues translation from Yiddish and analysis of letters sent by Levi Yitzkhak Liderman to his son, Morris, who was settled, initially, in New York City in 1910. For further background, see the first post in this series

I have included a small family tree at the end of the post.
 
For links to other posts in this series, scroll to the bottom.

As noted previously, translation is an art. Any comments or clarifications by Yiddish speakers/translators are welcome.


This correspondence was in a letter rather than a postcard. No envelope had been saved. We know that Levi Yitzkhak was still working away from home (Annopol) in Polonnoe from the text of the letter, itself.

Levi Yitzkhak did not include the year along with the date of the letter (4 July). He did, however, include the parshas - the Torah reading for the week: Chukas Balak. I checked on Hebcal.org and found that Chukas Balak had to have been read on 4 July 1911 rather than in the any of the following years of 1912, 1913 or 1914. 

Translation

Translation by Esther Chanie Dushinsky

[Notes in blue as well as those at the end of the post are mine. As on his postcards, Levi Yitzkhak tried to squeeze as much on the paper as possible and did not often break the text into paragraphs. For ease of reading, I have added my own paragraph breaks in the translation.]

[Side 1]

Chukas Balak

Tuesday, 21 June [Russian], 4 July [English]

My Dear and Beloved son, dear to my soul, Mr. Moshe Shalom Mordekhai,

I received your letters, meaning, your cards that you sent home [Annopol], as well as what you sent directly to me in Polonnoe at the address Itzek Benis [written in Russian alphabet].[1] Mother, should live, also sent the letters that you sent to her. The wishes that mother and I have wished for you should be fulfilled. Quite a while has passed, and we haven't received letters from you and we were beside ourselves. I wrote to mother, and she wrote to me, asking one another whether either of us received anything from you. Bottom line, thank God we received the cards from you. We thank our beloved God for your health. God should give that we should continue to hear the same from you, amen.

Moshe'leh, I must write to you that I have been thinking about for a while already, and I don't even know what. You keep on writing very, very short cards and you wrote nothing about your day to day activities, who you spend time with, and where. And on top of that, you are now writing from a different address.[2] You write that you moved to a different place. I have a feeling that there's a reason for this. Even though you wrote that the reason you moved is because your shop is too far from the uncle's home. But I think something else happened, because in my opinion, it isn't straight-forward. Firstly, I gather that you were treated well there, and yet, the children, you most likely lived quite well. Simply put, it cost you less, for example food, sleeping arrangements and living space, etc. And most importantly, the uncle and aunt most likely watched over you, considering that you are their only sister's child. And yet, I gather you are a child that is used to - as they say - "in the mother's apron." So, my dear son, write a long letter to me, in detail about everything. Let me know what's going on with you. Where and to whom did you move, and the honest truth as to what brought you to do this. If, my dear son, something happened to you, even more so. As it says, "ask your father and he will tell you." Write to me with heart and soul [? center fold of letter] and answer. I am depending on you.

A few _____[two letters?] from Shalom Nachum, Mottel, Reuven last week Tuesday. Meaning, the second day Rosh Chodesh Tamuz, the 27th of June [?] English.[3] Staying at my brother Avraham Abba.[4] I had to take care of some business. When they saw me, they asked and cried to me, begged and pleaded with a broken heart [?]. Meaning, Mottel, Nachum - Nachum, Mottel - Moshe'leh, your Moshe'leh. Nachum, since he's in America he hasn't sent them even one letter. To Mottel'n [?] he writes a letter every week and to them he doesn't even send a greeting. Mottel they tell me, sent them a letter after Pesach, and wrote, "Father, Mother, Mother, Father," look at my handwriting, because you won't see letters from me anymore. As they were sharing this story, everyone started crying. Avraham Abba, Khana and the children cried bitter tears, asking with great sighs, "What is my sin?" What happened? [5] Mottel says that because they haven't sent letters to him for a long while. But they swear that they did send a letter to him, but it seems that the address wasn't written correctly and, therefore, Mottel didn't receive the letters. 

Now Avraham Abba gave me a letter from them, that I should add it to the letter I am now writing. They ask that you should be the middleman and give it to Mottel, and Mottel should see to it that from today onward, he should send to the correct address. But please send Mottel's address to me and I will forward it. But you see to it that you chastise Mottel that one doesn't do such things. Why do they nebech deserve such pain?[6]

Mottel, Mottel, I always hope for a good ____. Why would you do such things to your parents, give them pain and heartache? Why do they nebech deserve it? Father and Mother nebech cried bitter tears to me. Even if a father and mother do wrong sometimes, the child still has to judge them favorably. Especially as they swear that they are not at fault. That some bad luck got involved here, that the address was wrong. All the more, I think that a child has to share their pleasures with their parents as much as possible and you are giving them such troubles. I am asking that you do this for my sake and write a letter to them. Write to me as well about your life, about your day to day. Write about my diamond, Moshe'leh. Moshe'leh will write to me about you. If you are living in peace and love and friendship.

[Side 2]

Moshe'leh, Moshe'leh, I wrote to you about Zaidl'en that he traveled to Ekaterinoslav and I haven't received a letter from him about how he's doing. I hope that God will help that he should find something. It is time that God should have mercy on him and our luck should get better. We should merit nackhas.[7] Amen. 

From your father who wants to know how you are doing and worries about you and prays for you, and hopes for your good. _____

See Moshe'leh, give the letter to Avraham Abba's Mottel'n and tell Mottel'n to him, to Nachum'n. And write to me about everything.

I see in your cards that you take an additional $7.50 for _____ cards. I am reading that in America they don't have _____ a few dollars isn't good [?]. You responded that you had to help Zaidl'en, and it is indeed the _____ you write that you don't have. Bottom line is that I know you and you are not a _____. Meaning, you don't lie, God forbid [?]. I am asking that you should write about everything. The truth, truth, truth.

They tell me at Avraham Abba's that those that travel to America, change. Meaning, who is greater than Moshe'leh? He promised and promised that he will write the honest truth and at the end he doesn't write. One becomes a different person. Why are you silent, Moshe'leh?

Moshe'leh, I will sign this letter. I received the letter from home in the evening on the _____ [page is torn] and _____ [torn] at mother's, should live. She received a card from Zaidel'n on last week Wednesday. He writes that _____ [torn] nothing. He writes that he arrived and found a guest house [?] where _____ [transliterated as sluzashtshe; probably слузаще, meaning "on occasion." So, Zaidel could stay there occasionally.] stay there. And they tell him that he should try from his end. God should help with the best. Mother nebech can't calm down this time as well, because she hasn't received a letter from you.

The address for Zaidel

Екатеринославь [Yekaterinoslav]

Крестовая Ул. [Krestovaya Street]

Конопенко Кв. Фраина [Konopenko Kv. Fraina]

Лидерманв [Liderman] 

Moshe'leh, write to him, perhaps a card. I ask him to write to you. 

Notes: 

1. This looks like a name to me: Itzek Benis. [Ицеку Бенису]

2. Moshe (Morris) had been living with his uncle (his mother's brother) and aunt, Jacob and Hannah (Anna) Simberg, at 134-136 Cannon Street, New York, New York.

3. Rosh Chodesh is the beginning of the Hebrew month. In the case of the month of Tamuz, Rosh Chodesh is two days: the last day of the previous month (Sivan) and the first day of Tamuz. So, in 1911, 1 Tamuz was the 27th of June.

4. Avraham Abba Garber and his wife Khana Matsevitski lived in the community of Labun (today called Yurovshchina, Ukraine). By June of 1911, two of their sons had emigrated and lived in Manhattan: Nachum (Nathan) and Mottel (Max). Mottel immigrated in December 1907 and Nachum in June 1910, just a few weeks before his first cousin Moshe Lederman (in August 1910). My grandfather, Jankel (Jack) - their third son - immigrated in September 1912.

5. The Garber children living at home in Labun at that time  were (in age order) Perl, Sarah, Jankel, Feiga and Aron.

6. Nebech is a Yiddish interjection meaning "you poor thing!" - an unfortunate person.

7. Nachas is Yiddish for joy or blessings from pride in (usually) one's children's accomplishments.

 


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07 September 2020

Letters from Levi Yitzkhak Lederman, 27 May 1911

This post continues translation from Yiddish and analysis of letters sent by Levi Yitzkhak Liderman to his son, Morris, who was settled, initially, in New York City in 1910. For further background, see the first post in this series

For links to other posts in this series, scroll to the bottom.

As noted previously, translation is an art. Any comments or clarifications by Yiddish speakers/translators are welcome.

Postmark

27 May 1911, Polonnoe, Wol. [Volhynia Gubernia]

[This is the Julian calendar date, which was in effect in the Russian Empire at this time. The letter was posted the same day it was written. The equivalent in the Gregorian calendar (in use in the United States, then and now) was 9 June 1911.]

Addressed to:

Mr. J. Simberg
134-136 Cannon Street
New York
U.S. of America
for Morris Lederman

Translation

Translation by Esther Chanie Dushinsky

[Notes in blue as well as those at the end of the post are mine. Levi Yitzkhak tried to squeeze as much on the card as possible and did not break the text into paragraphs. For ease of reading, I have added paragraph breaks in the translation.]

[Side 1]

Friday eve of Shabbos, Naso, 9 June English, 27 May Russian [1]

My dear and beloved son, as precious as my soul, Mr. Moshe-Shalom-Mordekhai, should live.

This past week on Friday, on the eve of Shevuos, I received your letter from home.[2] And today, here in Polonnoe _____ I came back here on Monday and found a letter from you. I am reading your _____ [outcry?] that you haven't received a letter from me. And it is surprising to me and all of us that you didn't receive a letter, not the one from mother _____ _____ [looks like a name that starts with F/P, but it's indecipherable]. I hope that you get the letters soon, there is no other possibility, other than that the letters were held up on the way. _____ not allow any _____.

There is no _____, and has nothing to add, and the new _____ and will wake up and Zanvel [?] will manage to travel to Ekaterinoslav - didn't I express in the previous letters that _____, most likely there won't be _____. God should help that it should be for the best. Sadly, he hasn't traveled yet, he is waiting an address that should get to him from there.[3]

Aside from Toba's groom, meaning Gittele's groom, he received more protektzia [preferential treatment due to some connections] there, from someone we know, and we hope that God will help and something will work out. The truth is that Zanvel is a capable person. He isn't a lost cause. Most likely God will have mercy and something will work out for the best.

[Side 2]

Moshe'leh, what's the story as to why you started writing very shortly? You don't write about what your job is, you don't write whether you earn enough or not, you don't write about how you spend your days. Write, write, my child, your _____ [writing is faded at the fold of the paper], your leisure time. 

And what about Reuven? You haven't written about him? Did he get married? With whom and where?[4]

Bottom line, my son, my son, write, write. I slept here, I ate here, I spent my time here.

Your father who worries about you _____

Send regards to my brother in law in my name.[5] 

Notes:

1. The Torah reading for Naso is Numbers 4:21–7:89. The Hebrew date of this card was 13 Sivan 5671.

2. Home was in Annopol, Ostrog District. Shavuos, a two-day observance, started at sundown on Thursday, 19 May 1911 (Julian calendar) and 1 June in 1911 (Gregorian calendar). It is called the "Feast of Weeks" or the Pentecost. It marks the time when the Jews received the Torah on Mount Sinai.

3. In the previous letter (postmarked 21 May 1911), Levi Yitzkhak  mentioned that someone named Gittel, daughter of Toba, was engaged and her future husband, a successful businessman said he could help Zanvel, Levi Yitzkhak's older son, find work in Ekaterinislav. 

4. In his letter postmarked 11 May 1911, Levi Yitzkhak mentioned Reuben to whom he'd written a letter that had been returned probably because the address was incorrect. I noted in that post that I was working on the possibility that Reuben was Reuben Resnick. See note 4 on that post.

5. Levi Yitzkhak's brother-in-law was his wife's brother, Jacob Simberg.

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22 August 2020

Letters from Levi Yitzkhak Lederman, 21 May 1911

This post continues translation from Yiddish and analysis of letters sent by Levi Yitzkhak Liderman to his son, Morris, who was settled, initially, in New York City in 1910. For further background, see the first post in this series

For links to other posts in this series, scroll to the bottom.

As noted previously, translation is an art. Any comments or clarifications by Yiddish speakers/translators are welcome.



Postmark

21 May 1911, Annopol, Wolin G. [Volhynia Gubernia]

[This is the Julian calendar date, which was in effect in the Russian Empire at this time. The letter was written two days earlier on 19 May 1911. The equivalent in the Gregorian calendar (in use in the United States, then and now) was 1 June 1911.]

Addressed to:

Mr. J. Simberg
134-136 Cannon Street
New York
U.S. of America
for Morris Lederman

Translation

Translation by Esther Chanie Dushinsky

[Notes in blue as well as those at the end of the post are mine. Levi Yitzkhak tried to squeeze as much on the card as possible and did not break the text into paragraphs. For ease of reading, I have added paragraph breaks in the translation.]

Thursday, eve of Shavous, May 19, 1911[1]

My dear and beloved son Mr, Moshe, greetings and blessings, should live. I am currently in my home.[2] I came yesterday afternoon with the train, 4th class, at 4 in the afternoon, to _____ [looks like Sloshtin]. I found 2 cards from you, and I read that what you wrote in your letters, that your pay is currently $7.50 a week, I will comfort you and say that it should be His will that you should find favor in the eyes of God and mankind. That your situation should change for the better with blessings and good luck, amen.

In our house, thank God, everyone is healthy and whole, and I hope to hear the same from you.

Why, my son, wouldn't you write to us what work you do. Is the work itself ____ [OK?]. You seem to _____, or is a different job possible?

Here there is some new awakening. A new wedding, I wish that this is a sign of good things coming. Gittel daughter of _____ [Toba or Tuvya/Toivya] got engaged. Her groom is a businessman. They say that he is a big businessman, and all his _____ [projects?], he is _____ [mektranas?] _____ [Russian word].[3]

In the beginning, Zanvel asked him if he can find him some work or job, or something.[4] Now he has asked him to come, and has a project that is ongoing since before Pesach.[5]

When Zanvel got this offer he sent a letter to Polonnoe to me _____ that I should help him with 50.[6] Faiga'n - he says, you gave.[7] Moshe'n to travel to America, you gave. Why am I the sacrifice!!! While I was reading the letter, I cried bitter tears. What should I do? The truth is that I _____ [faded and creased] a letter that when I will come home after Shavous, I will give

[second side]

to perhaps figure it out, Now he traveled to Faiga'n, she should help him with 20 X 30 rubles. He wants to make some clothing, because he can't travel like a shlepper [beggar]. He just now, at this moment, arrived back home and she didn't give him anything. She sadly can't help him. It's _____ can't invest. The expenses are great, may there be no evil eye [kein ayin hora]. And now I don't know what we can do. She promised she will give him, but at a later time, in a while. He can't wait, because we received another letter from Gittel's groom that he should travel. He writes that he can't seem to find a job, but that he should come anyway and he will try to find something for him to occupy himself. He guarantees

[upside down]

that it will work out.

Your father _____  _____

Mama and _____ [Zanvel?] Sarah are greeting you.

Notes:

1. Shavuous (Shavuot) is the Jewish holiday commemorating the day the Jews received the Torah on Mount Sinai.

2.  Home, at this point, was in Annopol (today called Hannopil), in Ostrog Uyezd, Volhynia Gubernia.

3. The word in Russian is 

To me this looks like ектримислав [ektrimislav] (the two lines at the end are part of the previous Yiddish word). I believe it should probably be Ekaterinoslav - a city later now known as Dnipro or Dnipropetrovs'k.

4. Zanvel (sometimes referred to in these letters as Zeidel) was Moshe's older brother.

5. Pesach = Passover

6. Levi Yitzhak Liderman (Moshe's father, the author of the postcard) had been working in Polonnoe (aka Polonnoye).

7. Levi Yitzkhak and Frieda Liderman had four children: Faiga (who lived in Baranovka), Zanvel, Moshe (in New York City) and Sarah (still at home with her mother in Annopol).

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26 July 2020

Letters from Levi Yitzkhak Lederman, 11 May 1911

This post continues translation from Yiddish and analysis of letters sent by Levi Yitzkhak Liderman to his son, Morris, who was settled, initially, in New York City in 1910. For further background, see the first post in this series

For links to other posts in this series, scroll to the bottom.

As noted previously, translation is an art. Any comments or clarifications by Yiddish speakers/translators are welcome.

As an aid to understanding, I have placed a family tree at the end of the post.









Postmark

11 May 1911, Polonnoe, Volin G. [Volhynia Gubernia]
[This is the Julian calendar date, which was in effect in the Russian Empire at this time. The letter was written two days earlier on 9 May 1911. The equivalent in the Gregorian calendar (in use in the United States, then and now) was 22 May 1911.]


Addressed to: 

Mr. J. Simberg

134-136 Cannon [Street]

Neu Yorc

for Morris Liderman

[The Russian printed text on the top left side of the card reads: L. Liderman.]

Translation

Translation by Esther Chanie Dushinsky

[Notes in blue as well as those at the end of the post are mine. Levi Yitzkhak tried to squeeze as much on the card as possible and did not break the text into paragraphs. For ease of reading, I have added paragraph breaks in the translation.]


9 May [Russian calendar], 22 May [USA calendar] 1911
Tuesday, Bamidbar[1]

My dear and beloved son, my ____ soul, Mr. Moshe'leh, should live. They sent all you letters from my house, to me, as well as the postcard that you sent to my current address ____.[2]

I read your letters that there is hope that ____ 12 dollars to ____. I am adding my request, and I am asking, who is going to give, and I hope that the Ribono Shel Olam [God] will judge you favorably and your charisma will be seen in the eyes of others, with even greater charisma, good luck and blessings.

Why, my son, wouldn't you write to me the entire time what job you currently have? Will you have a specific job, or will you just be working for them?

____ ____ [last week?] I received the letter and card that were returned to me from America. ____ Rosh Chodesh Nissan ____, 17 March Russia, 30 March English.[3] And I sent you this card to Reuven's address, A 132. Most likely they couldn't find him in America, so they sent it back to me, what is this? It could be, that if you'd write to me that Reuven got married already and is in the country already, that's why they couldn't find him in New York.[4]

You wrote that you had not letters for 12 days. That's surprising to me, because I write a letter to you, from here every single week, They also write to you from home amost every week. What could be the matter [?]?

Moshe'leh, my son, today I picked up a letter today from our Zanvel'n a letter. He's complaining sadly - he tells me "you gave to Faiga'n, you gave to Moshe'n, and I am the sacrifice."[5] I am crying and mourning over this. What can I do? One God should have mercy. I write to mother that she should sell the home and we can settle somewhere else. Because I am depending ____ ____ our situation is very dire.

[side 2]
A fine, smart, a ____ and has nothing to do in Bushtin [?]. It's possible that in Polonnoe he might find something to do. Times flies. He isn't a boy anymore. What can we do? "What do we do?" He wants me to give him 50 Rubles [?], so that he can travel to ____ or somewhere else. What you wrote about, when I will be home I will see where it will take me. I should come up with a good idea, a solid idea to advise him!

Your father who wants the best for you, good luck, and happiness, ____ ____

[upside down]
Send regards to my brother in law and the entire family.[6]

Notes:
1. Bamidbar is the 34th weekly Torah reading in the Jewish cycle. It is the book Numbers 1:1-4:20.
2. Home was, at this time, in Annopol. Levi Yitzkhak was working in Polonnoe, 57.4 kilometers (35.6 miles) distant.
3. The Hebrew date, 1 Nissan (Rish Chodesh) 5671, was the equivalent of Gregorian calendar (USA), 30 March 1911, and Julian calendar (Russia), 17 March 1911.
4. [Don't tell anyone ;-) but] I am working on an hypothesis that this Reuben mentioned in several letters was Reuben Resnick. Reuben and his sister Pearl Resnick Flikoff (some letters also mention Pearl in the same breath as Reuben) were immigrants from the same general area (Zaslav Uyezd) as the Lederman and Garber families. Reuben lived in Lower Manhattan until he married Rose Berse on 19 March 1911. Shortly after that, he moved to Plainfield, Union County, New Jersey, where he opened a stationery/candy store. If this is the correct Reuben, then Levi Yitzkhak might have considered Reuben's move out of New York City as a move out to the country. Reuben's father was identified as Jacob Resnick and his mother as Rose Flikoff (Pearl may have married a cousin). I think that Reuben and Pearl might have been related to the Ledermans via their father's Resnick line. See Reuben's marriage record: New York Co., NY, marriage certificate no. 8218 (1911), Reuben Resnick and Rose Berse, 19 March 1911; Municipal Archives, New York City. More on this possibility as the information does or does not click into place.
5. Zanvel and Feiga are two of Moshe's siblings.
6. Moshe had been staying (or at least collecting his mail) at his uncle's (Jacob Simberg) home.
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05 July 2020

Letters from Levi Yitzkhkak Lederman, 27 April 1911

This post continues translation from Yiddish and analysis of letters sent by Levi Yitzkhak Liderman to his son, Morris, who was settled, initially, in New York City in 1910. For further background, see the first post in this series

For links to other posts in this series, scroll to the bottom.


As noted previously, translation is an art. Any comments or clarifications by Yiddish speakers/translators are welcome.



As an aid in understanding, I have included a family tree at the bottom of this post.



Postmark

27 April 1911, Polonnoe, Volin [Volhynia Gubernia]
[This is the Julian calendar date, which was in effect in the Russian Empire at this time. The letter was written one day earlier on 26 April 1911. The equivalent in the Gregorian calendar (in use in the United States, then and now) was 9 May 1911.]



Addressed to: 

Mr. J. Simberg
134-136 Cannon Street
Neu Yorc C.
for Morris Liderman

[The Russian printed text on the top left side of the card reads: L. Liderman.]

Translation

Translation by Esther Chanie Dushinsky

[Notes in blue as well as those at the end of the post are mine. Levi Yitzkhak tried to squeeze as much on the card as possible and did not break the text into paragraphs. For ease of reading, I have added paragraph breaks in the translation.]


3 Iyyar, May 9 [English], 26 April [Russian] 1911[1]

My dear son, as beloved as my own soul, Mr. Moshe'leh, should live. I received your card from Pesach that mother, should live, sent to me from home. Since then, I haven't received a single letter from me. Usually they send the letters with the Saturday mail. but this past Shabbos I didn't get anything. I know why. She planned to send it when she has an opportunity. This is Mr. Baruch Basya'kas [likely Baruch son of Basya]. He should have traveled here, but for some reason he didn't come. Most likely he will come at a later time. Mother plans to send it with him and won't have to pay for postage.

Leah Greenfield Saltzman
Today I received a letter from Faiga'n. Thank God for their health. Leah'nyu is currently studying in Zhitomir since Purim and they want her to _____ [Russian word transliterated as koncza, meaning end or terminate] towards _____ [transliterates as optekarski utcenicza][
аптекарский ученица (aptekarskiy uchenitsa) means pharmacy student], or _____ [dantist-ka][дантист (dantist) is dentist].[2] And this time she is complaining again as to why you don't write to her. I sent her your cards, which on one card you wrote that Sura'le "How is my dear and beloved sister, the Barnaker [?]."[3] She writes about Sura'la that she is very happy that you are at least inquiring about her and wishes you and blesses you in the letter. I wish it will be fulfilled.

Here at home

[side 2]
there is no news. We thank God for our health. I hope to hear the same from you. Most likely in the letter that you have written to me during this time, you wrote everything about yourself. You write that you have _____ to travel to _____[Lun?][likely, Lynn].[4] Did you travel already, and how was the way? You father that loves you and blesses you with heart and soul _____  _____

Send regards to my brother in law _____.[5]

Notes:
1. May 9 (Gregorian calendar) and 26 April (Julian calendar) are equivalents. 3 Iyyar in the Hebrew calendar is a mistake. The correct equivalent Hebrew calendar date in 1911 would have been 11 Iyyar.

2. So it seems that the school that Leah was attending in Zhitomyr was encouraging her to continue her education in either pharmacy or dentistry. It does not appear that she pursued either of those careers. For further information on Leah, Faiga Liderman Grinfeld's eldest daughter, and her attendance at gymnasium (similar to a junior college) in Zhitomyr, see this blog post.

3. Sura was Morris' other sister.

4. A few months later, in August 1911, Morris moved to Lynn, Massachusetts. So, he likely took a trip there earlier to evaluate opportunities. It makes sense that Levi Yitzkhak would transliterate Lynn as Lun in Hebrew because in the Cyrillic alphabet the letter Y is pronounced as as oo.

5. Jacob Simberg