29 January 2015

Treasure Chest Thursday: First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association 25th anniversary, Part 4

The First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association, a community association for former residents of Lubin, Russian Empire (aka Labun or, now Yurovshchina, Ukraine), celebrated the anniversary of their founding in 1911 with a commemorative publication. I have been sharing a few of the pages of this document.
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
An earlier post regarding the group's incorporation papers, is located here.
 
GREETINGS AND SALUTATIONS

GREETINGS AND SALUTATIONS on this gala occasion the 25th Jubilee Anniversary of our worthy Organization, the First Lubiner Prog. Benevolent Ass'n.
It is, truly, thrilling and inspiring to greet you all, members, friends and guests and to have you join here in celebrating this auspicious occasion.
It is my sincere wish that this Brotherhood shall live for many years to come and continue to spread much joy and happiness in our midst, and charity and help to those less fortunate than ourselves
Again wishing you all much good, I am,
                                Cordially,
                                     SAMUEL MYERS, Treasurer 

I discussed a little about Sam Myers in a previous post. He was likely from Podolia Gubernia - probably Kamyanets-Podilskiy - and his original surname had been Malzman. He arrived in the United States in 1912 masquerading as an offspring of David Malzman - my great great grandfather. In reality, it is more likely that he was a cousin of David's children. The links in this relationship are, as yet, unclear.

What is clear is that Sam's father's name was actually Elias. He provided this information on both his Social Security application (SS-5) and his marriage certificate.[1]

Sam, a glazier, married Esther Newman in Brooklyn on 10 February 1917.[2] One of the witnesses to the marriage was my great great uncle Louis Myers (whom Sam had identified on his manifest as his "brother").[3]

Sam and Esther had three children: Ann Myers Lang, Elinor Myers Sherr and Sol Myers. After Esther's passing, Sam married Reva on 20 March 1970.[4]  

Sam died on 7 May 1975. His obituary indicates that, in addition to his leadership role in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association, he had been active in his synagogue as past president of the Jewish Center of Brighton Beach.[5]

Notes:
1. On his SS-5, Sam indicated his father's name was Elliot (probably an Anglicized version of his first name).
Samuel Myers, SS no. 109-28-2478, 27 December 1952, Application for Social Security Account Number (Form SS-5), Social Security Administration, Baltimore, Maryland.
2. Kings County, New York, marriage certificate no. 1917-2284, Brooklyn, New York, Samuel Myers and Esther Newman, Municipal Archives, New York City. 
3. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 23 November 2008), manifest, S.S. Noordam, Rotterdam to New York, arriving 27 August 1912, list 2, line 5, Zise Meyers; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial: T715; Microfilm Roll: 1921. 
4. Brooklyn, New York, probate case files, no. 1975-3562, Samuel Myers (1975), letters of administration, 1 August 1975; Kings County Surrogate's Court, Brooklyn. 
5. Samuel Myers, death notice, New York Times, 9 May 1975; digital image, New York Times.com (http://www.nytimes.com : accessed 27 August 2011).

27 January 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Isidore Bauman, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY

The First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association, a New York City landsmanshaft group for immigrants from the town of Lubin (Yiddish name), also known as Labun, Russian Empire, purchased two burial plots in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY and one in Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, NY.

Because many of these people constituted my Lubin relatives' friends, acquaintances and neighbors, I have recorded these burials and submitted them to JewishGen where they are online in the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry. For inclusion in that database, I translated the Hebrew names on the tombstones. I did not, however, translate any epitaphs. In posts about burials in these plots, I will provide translations of any epitaphs and information about those interred.
~~~~~~~~~~
photo by E. Garber, 7 September 2008
 Here lies
Yitzchak son of Dov
Died 7 Nisan 5727
ISIDORE
BAUMAN
Beloved husband
Devoted father
Dear grandfather
and brother

March 18, 1891
April 17, 1967
~~~~~~~~~~
Isidore Bauman has been mentioned previously here and here in recent posts regarding his leadship position in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association.

On this tombstone Isidore's father is identified as Dov. On his manifests, both in 1910 and 1913, Isidore identified his father, Berko, as his closest relative still in the old country.[1] On his certificate of marriage to Ida Molthman, his father is Benjamin and his mother is Fannie Elfman.[2]

Despite the seeming differences, Dov, Berko and Benjamin are clearly the same person. In eastern Europe it was common for men to have at least two names: their Hebrew name (used when they were called to the Torah) and their everyday-use Yiddish moniker. Dov is Hebrew for bear. Ber is Yiddish for bear and the -ko at the end creates a nickname - a diminuative.  Dov and Ber, two names with the same meaning in their respective languages, are a common combination.

Someone (I wish I could recall whom) once coined the term 'Sam-ification' for the common practice of immigrants Anglicizing their parents' names on official documents - even if those parent had never stepped foot in the United States. For Isidore, his father Berko became Benjamin (I suppose if his name had been Shlomo, it would have become Sam!).

Isidore's grave is located in Montefiore Cemetery, Glendale, Queens, New York, First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot, Block 89, gate 156N, Line 11R, Grave 3.
 
Notes:
1. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 24 April 2010), manifest, S.S. Noordam, Rotterdam to New York, arriving 14 Jun 1910, list 16, line 29, Itzchok Baumelman; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial: T715; Microfilm Roll: 1500.
"New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 21 November 2010), manifest, S.S. Neckar, Bremento New York, arriving 15 February 1913, list 10, line 17, Iczrok Beimelman; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial: T715; Microfilm Roll: 2014.  
2. New York County, New York, Certificate and Record of Marriage no. 1368 (8 January 1916). Isidore Bauman and Ida Molthman, Municipal Archives, New York, New York.  
 

22 January 2015

Jewish News (Phoenix, AZ) publishes beginning Jewish genealogy article

Jewish News has posted my recent article. I'm hoping to snag those who are considering genealogical research, but don't know how to get started. The article also lists resources for Jewish genealogy education both in the Phoenix metro area through the Bureau of Jewish Education (two courses by yours truly) and online via JewishGen.

Treasure Chest Thursday: First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association 25th anniversary, Part 3

A few months ago I acquired copies of several pages of a publication printed in honor of the anniversary of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association (FLPBA), a landsmanshaft (community organization) in New York City. Earlier posts on this publication may be found here and here.

I have been most excited about seeing, for the first time, photos of some of my relatives.  This post concerns a possible relative by marriage (Isidore Bauman) and his leadership message (in Yiddish) to the FLPBA membership.[1]



I uploaded this image of Isidore's text on ViewMate - a wonderful service provided by JewishGen and its awesome volunteer army. Within a few hours I had three volunteer translators collaborating to complete the translation.[2]


A greeting from the Vice President
Twenty-five years have flown by since I was still a young and joyful youngster, when destiny had thrown me with my whole being into this organization which celebrates its 25th jubilee.[3]

25 years! How quickly the years flew by!

The idealistic dedication and readiness to make sacrifices of those who are not with us anymore, the true devotion with which we all have put the foundations stone by stone and turned this organization into what it is today.

25 years ... quick! It was a long chain of happy, warm days, and also - sleepless nights, standing on guard for the interests of the members. I hope that none of us will stop his activities, and we all will continue to be devoted to the society and we will not forget our sisters and brothers who are still in Lubin. 

From the bottom of my heart I wish all the members and their families to live to celebrate the 50th anniversary.

Itzkhak Bauman
Similar to many such landsmanshaft (countrymen's) organizations, the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association provided benefits for the welfare and burial of their members. I, unfortunately, do not have any society papers documenting their many good works in the United States. In a later post I will discuss one of their projects for improving the lot of their brethren left in their home town Lubin.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Notes:
1. Isidore, from Lubin, married fellow Lubiner Ida Molthman. Ida was the daughter of Benjamin Molthman, whose surname in the old country had been Malzman. All of my Myers relatives were also Malzmans from Lubin. Benjamin was also in the glass business for a short while with my great grandfather Isidore Morris, whose wife (my ggm) was Sarah Myers (Malzman) Morris. So, the relationship between Molthman and Myers was close, but still not completely understood.
2. Special thanks to Emma Karabelnik, Ite Doktorski and Ann B. Lnder for generously sharing their Yiddish skill and understanding and to JewishGen for starting and maintaining ViewMate.
3. Emma Karabelnik, in her translation, above, explains this idiom, noting that it directly translates as "with all my 248 organs." The Jewish Virtual Library discusses Jewish anatomy and says that 248 actually refers to bones in the body and follows rabbinic tradition in the Talmud.

20 January 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Selma Alperin, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY

The First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association, a New York City landsmanshaft group for immigrants from the town of Lubin (Yiddish name), also known as Labun, Russian Empire, purchased two burial plots in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY and one in Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, NY.[1]

Because many of these people constituted my Lubin relatives' friends, acquaintances and neighbors, I have recorded these burials and submitted them to JewishGen where they are online in the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry. For inclusion in that database, I translated the Hebrew names on the tombstones. I did not, however, translate any epitaphs. In posts about burials in these plots, I will provide translations of any epitaphs and information about those interred.
~~~~~~~~~~
I hate seeing burials for those who died young. One can only imagine the pain this brought to their families and friends - pain, doubt and guilt about whether more could have been done to keep this person alive.


Our Dear Child
-----
Here lies
Kayla Hentze
Sussie Rivka daughter of Yakov
Died 1st day of Rosh Chodesh Adar 1 5700
May her soul be bound in eternal life
SELMA
ALPERIN
Died Feb 9, 1940
Age 18 yrs
 -----
Beloved
DAUGHTER
and SISTER
~~~~~~~~~~ 

Selma was the only daughter and youngest child of Jacob and Dora Waxenberg Myers Alperin. This tombstone is interesting because it provides four Hebrew/Yiddish names for Selma: Kayla Hentze Sussie Rivka. Usually people have a maximum of two of these names. 

Dora's grandson, Peter, has told me that he recollects Dora as superstitious and wary of modern medicine. His take is that Selma had pneumonia and Dora did not provide enough medical care for her daughter. It is only fair to note, however, that penicillin, the preferred treatment for pneumonia, was still being researched in 1940 and was likely not available for treatment.

Selma's four Hebrew/Yiddish names, however, fit with Dora's allegedly superstitious nature. In "Jewish Given Names," an article in the Avotaynu Guide to Jewish Genealogy, Warren Blatt discusses names given in light of Jewish superstition that began during medieval times and continues to the present day. The Angel of Death apparently maintains a list of names. If he seeks a child with that name and cannot locate them, the child might be spared.[2] Additional names might be added to a child's name to help them hide from the Angel of Death.

Sometimes the additional names have amuletic qualities. That is, they have meanings that are tied to long life and good health (for example, Chaim and Chaya - meaning "life").  Whether Selma's names were all given at birth or whether some were added later when she became ill is not known. None of them appear to have intrinsic meaning regarding health or life. 

My guess is that Sussie was her original name. Since Askenazi Jewish people in the United States often gave their children American names that started with the same or a similar sound, Sussie and Selma are likely a match.

I have not been able to locate a death certificate for Selma in any online New York City indexes. It is possible she died outside of New York City - which could be a story in itself since the family lived in the Bronx at the time of Selma's death. 
______________________________________
Special thanks to Israel Pickholtz, Adam Brown, Esther Chanie Dushinsky, Deb Morgan Stern, Fred Leserowitz, Sondra Shira Robins Gold, Robin Meltzer, Brooke Schreier Ganz, Hanita Kossowsky, and Peter L. Myers for the spirited Tracing the Tribe (FaceBook) discussion of the names on this tombstone and when they might have been selected. Of course, any errors in selecting from among the several opinions expressed are my own. 

Notes:
1. Earlier posts about the FLPBA may be found at:
First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association incorporation papers
First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association 25th anniversary publication, Part 1
First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association 25th anniversary publication, Part 2
2.Warren Blatt, "Jewish Given Names," Avotaynu Guilde to Jewish Genealogy (Avotaynu: Bergenfield, New Jersey, 2004), 35-36,