16 September 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Etta bat Shemaya, Labun Cemetery

In June of 2013 I had the pleasure of visiting Ukraine and Labun (now Yurovshchina; once called Lubin in Yiddish), my paternal grandparents' community. We were able to visit the old Jewish cemetery, which I discussed in an earlier post. Over the next several Tuesdays I will post photos and translations (as I am able to decipher) of tombstones from that cemetery. Most do not feature surnames.


A woman tender in years*
Etta daughter of
Shemaya Died
14 Nisan 5673
May her soul be bound in everlasting life

Some of the letters are worn off by the elements. I suspect a Hebrew speaker may be able to determine the last word on the second line: "bish?m." [*I initially thought that the phase included the word rabah רבﬣ (great). In comments (below) Lara Diamond and Israel Pickholtz provided the next word bashanim. And Israel noted that the word that Lara and I both thought was rabah is actually racca רכﬣ (meaning tender). The letter in the middle of the word is caf (ﬤ) rather than bet (ב). This, of course, completely changes the message on the tombstone from a woman of great age to a woman of tender years. Sheesh! I have changed the translation, above.]

With the Jewish Calendar Conversion application from the Steve Morse One-Step website, the 14th day of the month Nisan in the year 5673 would correlate with 21 April 1913 in our (Gregorian calendar) and 8 April 1913 in the Julian calendar, which was in effect at the time of Etta's death.

11 September 2014

Treasure Chest Thusday: Aaron (Eddie) Garber & Esther Haber Marriage

Eddie Garber (aka Aaron) was the youngest son of Avrum and Chana Garber and the last of their children to arrive in the United States. Eddie (whose ship's manifest lists him as Aron Garber) landed in New York Harbor on 2 April 1922.[1]
New York County, New York, Certificate and Record of Marriage no. 16389 (15 June 1927), Aaron Garber and Esther Haber, Municipal Archives, New York.
Items shown in red text are items I will be discussing further below.

[1st page]
Groom: Aaron Garber
Residence: 1336 61st St., New York
Age: 26
Color: White
Single, Widowed or Divorced: Single
Occupation: Glasser [glazier]
Birthplace: Labin
Father's Name: Abraham
Mother's Maiden Name: Resnik
Number of Groom's Marriage: First

Bride: Esther Haber
Residence:
1336 61st St., New York
Age: 20
Color: White
Single, Widowed or Divorced: Single
Maiden Name, if a Widow: [blank]
Birthplace: Eltshe, Poland
Father's Name: Abe
Mother's Maiden Name: Newman
Number of Bride's Marriage: First
I hearby certify that the above-named groom and bride were joined in marriage by me, in accordance with the laws of the State of New York, at Rutgers St, in the borough of Manhatten, City of New York, this 15 of June, 1927.

                                                        Signature of person performing the ceremony:
                                                                                   /s/ Rabbi Yaer Lerner, 298 Madison St.
Witnesses         } Rabbi Charles Kahane       Official Station: 198 Penn St., Bklyn
to the Marriage } Fred Ribolow                       Residence: 11366 38 St, Bklyn

[2nd page]
WE hereby certify that we are the Groom and Bride named in this Certificate, and that the information given therein is correct, to the best of our knowledge and belief.
                              /s/Aaron Garber Groom
                              /s/Esther Haber Bride  

Signed in the presence of  /s/Rabbi Charles Kahane
and [blank]


Aaron's town of origin is mispelled as Labin actually Labun (or, Lubin, as it was called in Yiddish).

Resnik, identified as Aaron's mother's maiden name is  interesting in light of my recent foray into DNA and family lore. Aaron's mother's maiden name was actually Mazewitsky. His uncle, Isidore Morris (Aaron's mother's brother) changed the name to Morris after arrival in New York City. Reznik is one of the four names indicated in the family story about the family surname changing from Utchenik to Garber, Reznik and Lehman (or, perhaps, Liderman).

Rabbi Yaer Lerner was Rabbi in Labun and continued ministering to some in his congregation in New York City. He also performed the wedding for Aaron's sister, Fanny, eight months earlier.

Rabbi Charles Kahane, one of the witnesses, was a well-respected scholar and rabbi of the orthodox congregation at Avenue U Education Center (2066 9th Street), the synagogue my family attended once they migrated to Brooklyn from Manhattan. He was also, as it turns out, the father of one of the most well-known Jewish radicals of the second half of the 20th Century: Rabbi Meir Kahane. My family recalled little Martin as a child running around the synagogue. 

Notes: 
1. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com
 (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 7 February 2009), manifest, Lapland, Antwerp to New York, arriving 2 April 1922, list 7, line 5, Aron Garber; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial T715, Roll 3096.

 

09 September 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Rachel, Labun Cemetery

In June of 2013 I had the pleasure of visiting Ukraine and Labun (now Yurovshchina; once called Lubin in Yiddish), my paternal grandparents' community. We were able to visit the old Jewish cemetery, which I discussed in an earlier post. Over the next several Tuesdays I will post photos and translations (as I am able to decipher) of tombstones from that cemetery. Most do not feature surnames.


Here lies
A pleasant woman
Yachna Rachel 
daughter of Moshe
Died 5 Tammuz
5671  May her soul be bound in eternal life

A tree had grown around this tombstone and I am actually amazed that as much of it was still readable.

The adjective modifying "woman" on the first full line is cut off by the break in the stone. I am guessing that the full word may have been the Hebrew word chamida, which means "pleasant."

I am do not know what the word before Rachel may be. I am open to suggestions. [Thank you, Israel P, for the suggestion of the name Yachna].

With the Jewish Calendar Conversion application the 5th day of the month Tammuz in the year 5671 would correlate with 1 July 1911 in our (Gregorian calendar) and 18 June 1911 in the Julian calendar, which was in effect at the time of Rachel's death.

04 September 2014

Treasure Chest Thursday: Feiga Garber and Max Buchman Marriage Certificate

Feiga or Feigela (as Fannie was lovingly called within the family) was my grandfather Jack's youngest sister. And, because the Garbers did not have many family get-togethers, Feigela, who in later life resided with her eldest daughter Anita not very far from where my family lived, was the only sibling of my grandfather with whom I was familiar. She and her brother Eddie were the youngest of my grandfather's siblings and the last to immigrate from Labun
New York County, New York, Certificate and Record of Marriage no. 26716 (10 October 1926), Max Buchman and Fannie Garber, Municipal Archives, New York.
Items shown in red text are items I will be discussing further below.

[1st page]
Groom: Max Buchman
Residence: 1419 Daly Ave., Bronx
Age: 24
Color: White
Single, Widowed or Divorced: Single
Occupation: Furrier
Birthplace: Russia
Father's Name: Abraham
Mother's Maiden Name: Anna Rosen
Number of Groom's Marriage: first

Bride: Fannie Garber
Residence: 232 Madison St., NYC
Age: 23
Color: White
Single, Widowed or Divorced: Single
Maiden Name, if a Widow: [blank]
Birthplace: Russia
Father's Name: Abraham
Mother's Maiden Name: Anna Morris
Number of Bride's Marriage: First
I hearby certify that the above-named groom and bride were joined in marriage by me, in accordance with the laws of the State of New York, at 23 Montgomery St, in the borough of New York, City of New York, this 10 of Oktober, 1926.

                                                        Signature of person performing the ceremony:
                                                                                   /s/ Rabbi Yaer Lerner
Witnesses         } Max Sepenfeld [?]             Official Station: 236 Madison St.
to the Marriage } Louis Myers                       Residence: 1950 Andrews Ave, NYC

[2nd page]
WE hereby certify that we are the Groom and Bride named in this Certificate, and that the information given therein is correct, to the best of our knowledge and belief.
                              /s/Max Buchman Groom
                              /s/Fannie Garber Bride  

Signed in the presence of  /s/Max Sepenfeld
and /s/Louis Myers


Feiga's mother Chane Mazewitsky Garber died in Labun and never set foot in the United States. As often happens, however, Feiga in this record, gave her late mother the Americanized surname that had been adopted by her mother's brother, Isidore Morris.

Rabbi Yaer Lerner had been Rabbi in Labun. He continued ministering to some of his congregation once he immigrated.

Witness Louis Myers was a relation by Isidore Morris' marriage. He was Isidore's brother-in-law (Isidore's wife Sarah's brother). He was actually not related to Feiga, but was also from Labun.

02 September 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Reisel, Labun Cemetery

In June of 2013 I had the pleasure of visiting Ukraine and several ancestral family communities. Labun (now Yurovshchina; once called Lubin in Yiddish), my paternal grandparents' community was my principal goal. We were able to visit the old Jewish cemetery, which I discussed in an earlier post. Over the next several Tuesdays I will post photos and translations (as I am able to decipher) of tombstones from that cemetery. Most do not feature surnames.


An esteemed and modest woman
Mrs. Reisel daughter of
Yehoshuah Avraham
Died 6 Shevet
Sabbath, in the year 5673
May her soul be bound in everlasting life

In using Steve Morse's Hebrew calendar conversion tool, we find that Reisel died on 14 January 1913 (in today's Gregorian calendar), or in 1 January 1913 in the Julian calendar (which was in effect in the Russian Empire, where she died, until 1918).