06 December 2016

Tombstone Tuesday: Isidore and Ida Braverman, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

Isidore Braverman and Ida braverman are a bit of a mystery. Based on information in passenger manifests, I know they lived in Polonne (about ten miles NE of Labun/Lubin) before immigration, but I have not, thus far, determined their town of birth (I like to do that to assure myself that they were, indeed, Lubiners interred in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association burial plots).
 
Here lies
Aisik son of Shlomo ha-Levi
Died 12 Sivan 5693
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living
BELOVED HUSBAND
AND DEAR FATHER
ISIDORE
BRAVERMAN
DIED JUNE 6, 1933
AGE 75 YEARS
----------
FATHER
----------
Like so many immigrants from eastern Europe, Isidore's actual age is a bit fuzzy. On the passenger manifest of his arrival on the S.S. Statendam on 14 January 1904, he was reportedly 35 (born about 1869).[1] This gravestone suggests he was born about 1858. His death certificate indicates he was 70 when he died (born about 1863).[2]

Census enumerations add to the conflicts:
1910 U.S. census - about 1864 [3]
1915 NY State census - 1875 [4]
1920 U.S. census - 1860 [5]
1925 NY State census - 1864 [6]
1930 U.S. census - 1844 [7]

1844 seems like an outlier. And 1864 (the mode of the distribution) seems comforting. But, since no one has yet found vital records for Labun or Polonne, we are likely never to know exactly when he was born. 

The 1910 census provides some good information regarding Isidore's and  Ida's relationship. It shows that this was Isidore's 3rd marriage and Ida's first. They had been married for 13 years.
 
Here lies
Chaye daughter of Yosef ha-Kohen
Died 24 Shevat 5724
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living
BELOVED MOTHER
AND GRANDMOTHER
IDA
BRAVERMAN
DIED FEB. 7, 1964
AGE 95 YEARS
----------
MOTHER
----------


This makes quite a bit of sense considering their children's span of ages shown in the 1910 census: Sam was the eldest child at 23 and Herman was the next oldest at 12. So, Sam was a child from one of Isidore's earlier marriages. 

Ida and her children (Kalman, Dwoire and Ester) arrived in New York City on 29 May 1906 aboard the S.S. Statendam.[8] 

In New York City, the children living with Isidore and Ida were:
Samuel, born about 1885 in Russian Empire
Herman/Hyman, b. ca 1899 in Russian Empire
Dora, b. ca. 1901 in Russian Empire
Ester, b. ca 1902 in Russian Empire
Eva/Evelyn, b. 1907 in New York City
Bessie/Betty, b. ca. 1910 in New York City 
Samuel and Eva both died young and never married. They are buried in this First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot in this cemetery (and will be discussed in future posts). Eva likely married Benjamin Adler in 1931 (I have yet to acquire their marriage certificate).

On his passenger manifest Eisek/Isidore said he was a tailor. In New York City he worked sorting rags.

Isidore never became a citizen. I have noted an indexed record for someone named Ida Braverman who naturalized in 1942. I have ordered that record to determine if that is this Ida and if she identifies a birth location. I will update the post when I get the record from NARA - Northeast Region. In addition, I am pursuing further information regarding a possible marriage for Dora. If I can confirm who she married, I may be able to find naturalization information for her, as well.

It seems likely that after Isidore's death, Ida went to live with her daughter Eva Adler in Brooklyn.[9] 

Ida's gravestone indicates she was 95 at death (born about 1869). This may be a bit of an over-estimation. Earlier records seem to cluster her birth year about the mid-1870s.

Both Isidore's and Ida's graves are located in one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York. They are both in block 89, gate 156N. Isidore is buried in line 1R, grave 1 and Ida is in line 9L, grave 4.

Notes
1. Manifest, S.S. Statendam, 14 January 1904, stamped list B, line 22, Eisek Braverman, age 35; images, "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 March 2011).
2. Kings County, New York, death certificate no. 12297 (1933), Isidore Braverman, 6 June 1933; Municipal Archives, New York City. 
3. 1910 U.S. Census, New York County, New York, population schedule, Manhattan, enumeration district 98, sheet 1A and 1B, dwelling 1, family 9, Isidor and Ida Braverman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 December 2010); citing NARA microfilm publication T624, roll 1008.
4. 1915 New York State Census, New York County, New York enumeration of inhabitants, Manhattan, assembly district 6, election district 9, page 71, entries 44-50, Isidor and Ida Braverman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 January 2015); citing New York State Archives, Albany.
5. 1920 U.S. Census, New York County, New York, population schedule, Manhattan, enumeration district 481, sheet 12A, dwelling 18, family 267, Isidore and Ida Braverman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 December 2010); citing NARA microfilm publication T625, roll 1195.
6. 1925 New York State Census, Kings County, New York, enumeration of inhabitants, Brooklyn, assembly district 2, election district 47, page 36, entries 22-26, Isy and Ida Braverman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 December 2016); citing New York State Archives, Albany.
7. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-1211, sheet 5B, dwelling 46, family 117, Isidore and Ida Braverman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 November 2010); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1492.
8. Manifest, S.S. Statendam, 29 May 1906, stamped list 57, line 2, Chaje Braverman, age 30; images, "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 March 2011).
9. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-100, sheet 1B, household 19, Ida Braverman; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 December 2016); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2549.

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