18 July 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: Samuel and Rose Cantor, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

Back in November 2016 I researched and documented Zalman and Rachel Rochman, immigrants from Labun whose graves are in one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots in Montefiore Cemetery. At the time, I was able to locate records for their two sons, Charles Rochman and Aaron Rockman. I was not, however, able to find any records for their two daughters, Ronia and Mindla, who had immigrated with their mother.[1]

Well, I've located Ronia. In the United States, she became Rose Rochman and married Sam Kanchich, who became Sam Cantor.


CANTOR

Ronia daughter of Zalman
ROSE
BELOVED WIFE
MOTHER
GRANDMOTHER
JAN. 5,1903
DEC. 25, 1981

Yisrael son of Moshe Zav
SAMUEL
BELOVED HUSBAND
FATHER
GRANDFATHER
SEPT. 30, 1899
JAN. 20, 1978

TOGETHER IN LIFE, TOGETHER IN DEATH

The key to determining Rose Cantor's maiden name was linking her death records in the "California, Death Index, 1940-1997," database on Ancestry and her gravestone. The database included her birth (although identified as 1904, not 1903) and death date and her father's surname.[2] And, of course, her gravestone indicated that her father's name was Zalman. Further research and census and naturalization records confirmed earlier evidence.

Nineteen year old Ronia Rojchmann arrived in New York Harbor on the S.S. Mount Carroll on 1 November 1921 with her mother, Ruchla (Rachel), and her siblings, Szika (Charles), Aron (Aaron), and Mindla. Ruchla, her husband Zalman, and all the children were born in Labun.

Srul Kancrik (Samuel Cantor) arrived in New York on 22 February 1921.[3] He'd been born in and resided in what appears to have been Sudilkov [typed as "Serdylkow" on his manifest]. Sudilkov is 24 kilometers northeast of Labun. So, it is possible that he and Ronia knew each other before emigration.

The couple married on 31 May 1925 in Brooklyn.[4] By June of that year they lived in an apartment at 417 Hinsdale in Brooklyn.[5] Sam was a shoemaker.

Their first child Saul Cantor was born 20 February 1926 (he died 4 February 2004).[6] In 1930, the family lived at 158 Boerum Street, Brooklyn. Sam was an operator at a ladies shoe factory.[7] Their daughter Mildred Cantor was born in 1930.[8]

In 1940, the Cantors were at 442 Logan Street in Brooklyn and Sam had his own business running a grocery store.[9] Grandfather, Solomon (Zalman) Rochman lived with them. I had not located Rochman previously in the 1940 census. Seeking the Cantors allowed me to find him.

Sam Cantor's Social Security Death Index record indicates his last residence was in Brooklyn in 1978.[10] Rose, however, died almost three years later in Orange County, California.

Rose's and Samuel's graves are located in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot in block 89, gate 156N, line 1L, grave 3 and 4, Montefiore Cemetery.

Notes:
1. Manifest, S.S. Mount Carroll, 1 November 1921, p. 18, lines 1-5, Ruchla (age 46 [?]), Szika (11), Aron (9), Ronia (19), and Mindla (17) Rojchmann; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 April 2011).
2. "California, Death Index, 1940-1997," database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 September 1916), entry for Rose Cantor, 25 December 1981; citing California Department of Health Services, Sacramento. 
3. Manifest, S.S. Aquitania, 22 February 1921, list 15, line 6, Srul Kancrik, age 20; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 July 2017). 
4. Kings County, New York, marriage certificate no. 8252 (1925), Saul Kanchich and Rose Rackman; Municipal Archives, New York City; index, "NYC Brides Record Index," Italian Genealogy Group (http://www.italiangen.org : accessed 16 July 2017), search on sounds like "Rose Rockman." [original record will be ordered]
   Sam Cantor Petition for Naturalization (1933), naturalization file 188237, Eastern District of New York; images, "New York, State and Federal Naturalization Records, 1794-1940," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 July 2017). 
5. 1925 New York State census, Kings County, New York, enumeration of inhabitants, Brooklyn, assembly district 2, election district 47, p. 46, Sam and Rose Cantor; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 July 2017); citing New York State Archives, Albany. 
6. Sam Cantor Petition for Naturalization (1933), naturalization file 188237, Eastern District of New York.
7. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings Co., NY, pop. sched., Brooklyn, E.D. 24-170, p. 2A, dwelling 72, family 237, Samuel and Rose Cantor family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 December 2010); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1517.
8. Sam Cantor Petition for Naturalization (1933), naturalization file 188237, Eastern District of New York.
9. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings Co., NY, pop. sched., Brooklyn, E.D. 24-2664, p. 13A, household 251, Samuel and Rose Cantor family [indexed as Carter]; ; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 July 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2617.
10. "U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 September 2016); entry for Samuel Cantor, SSN 124-24-4001, January 1978.
11. "California, Death Index, 1940-1997," database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 September 1916), entry for Rose Cantor, 25 December 1981.  

11 July 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: Philip and Minnie Goldberg, Beth David Cemetery, Pinelawn, New York

A couple of weeks ago, I profiled Philip Goldberg's parents, Bernard and Lottie Goldberg, who are interred in one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots at Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY. 

Philip, born in Lubin/Labun, Russian Empire (today, Yurovshchina, Ukraine) arrived in Boston on the S.S. Manchuria with his mother, Zlate, and sisters Chaika, Minna and Sonja on 21 February 1921.[1] Philip's and his wife Minnie's graves are in the association plot at Beth Moses Cemetery in Pinelawn, NY.

FATHER
Pesach son of Avraham

PHILIP
GOLDBERG

DEVOTED AND GIVING
"HIS SPIRIT OF GOOD LIVES"

FEB. 4, 1904
JUNE 24, 1994
 -------------------------
MOTHER

Minna daughter of Binyamin
MINNIE "KOPELOV"
GOLDBERG
SHE WAS BEAUTIFUL AND
BRIGHT, YET SO SAD
BE AT PEACE, AT LAST
SEPT. 15, 1906 - NOV. 7, 1995

In June 1925, Philip, an unmarried glazier, lived with his mother, Lottie; brother, Herman; and sister Sylvia at 95 Ridge Street in Manhattan.[2] Philip and his family had been in the United States four years. Philip was not yet a citizen.

In April 1930, Philip and his same family members resided at 2067 Harrison Avenue in the Bronx.[3] In addition, Philip's elder sister, Ida, her husband Herman Dolgin and their daughter, Bernice, lived in the same apartment. Philip, a glazier working at a glass store, was still an alien.  

Minnie Kopelov naturalized on 3 September 1931.[4] She was single, working as a milliner and had immigrated on the S.S. Berengaria, landing in New York with her sister Roza on 2 November 1923.[5] She had been born in Warsaw.

According to Philip's naturalization papers, filed on 8 July 1937, he and Minnie married in Monticello, Sullivan County, New York on 7 July 1936.[6]

By the April 1940 U.S. census, Philip and Minnie had a 2 year old daughter, Rena.[7] They lived in an apartment at 69 Pinehurst Avenue, New York, New York. Philip owned a wholesale glass business.

According to their Social Security Death Index records, the couple's last residence was in Long Beach, Long Island, New York.[8] 

Both Philip and Minnie Goldberg's graves are located in Block 24, Maccabee Road within the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot in Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, New York.

Notes:
1. Manifest, S.S. Manchuria, 21 February 1921, stamped p. 286, lines 23-27, Zlata Goldberg (age 43), Chaiko (20), Pinko (17), Minna (13), and Sonja (10); images, "Massachusetts, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1820-1963," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 June 2017).
2. 1925 New York State Census, New York County, New York, enumeration of inhabitants, Manhattan, assembly district 4, election district 5, p. 48, Philip Goldberg; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 February 2017); citing New York State Archives, Albany. 
3. 1930 U.S. Census, Bronx Co., NY, population schedule, Bronx, enumeration district 3-605, sheet 5A, dwelling 2, family 99, Phillip Goldberg; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 February 2017); NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1486. 
4. Minnie Kopelov naturalization file no. 181609, 3 September 1931, Southern District of New York; images, "New York, Naturalization records, 1882-1944," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 June 2017); citing National Archives - Northeast Region, microfilm publication M1972m roll 753.
5. Manifest, S.S. Berengaria, 2 November 1923, stamped p. C. 19, line 13, Minia Kopelow, 17; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 July 2017).
6. Philip Goldberg naturalization file no. 290421, 8 July 1937, Southern District of New York; images, "New York, Naturalization records, 1882-1944," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 July 2017); citing National Archives - Northeast Region, Record Group 21.
7. 1940 U.S. Census, New York Co., NY, pop. sched., Manhattan, e.d. 31-2079, sheet 11A, household 205, Philip and Minnie Goldberg family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 June 2017); NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2675.
8. Social Security Administration, "U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 June 2017), entry for Philip Goldberg, SS no. 064-03-0167 and entry for Minnie Goldberg, SS no. 076-38-0433.