21 September 2017

Let's make Our Response to the NYC Vital Records Access Proposal Go Viral!

The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has posted notice of a proposal to change its rule for access to the vital records under its care: New York City birth and death records. I have to admit my favorite part of the posting is their insistence (it must be insistence since it is repeated several times on the page and is codified in the URL) that they are considering viral statistics provisions. 


That got me thinking this is our chance to make the genealogy community's response go viral. Let's do it!

Here's the scoop:

New York City is considering changing its rules for making birth and death records publicly available via the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. They are taking comments through 24 October 2017. Dick Eastman noted this on his blog at https://blog.eogn.com/2017/09/19/new-york-city-department-of-health-proposes-adoption-of-125-years-for-birth-records-50-years-for-death-records-embargoes/.

Laws of the State of New York restrict public access to birth records less than 100 years old and death records less than 50 years old. Currently, the New York City Municipal Archives has birth records available for viewing and purchase through 1909, death records through 1948 (they have marriage records, too, but later ones are maintained by the City Clerk and are not under consideration in this new rule). By the standards set by New York State, the Municipal Archives ought to also hold birth records through 1916 and death records through 1966. But, the State grants New York City discretion in setting its own rules for vital records access.

Current NYC rule 207 (which may be seen here), is not very specific. Yet, the keeper of later records, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOH), has set much more stringent requirements than the State.

Regardless of the time that has passed since a death event, death certificates in possession of the DOH (even if 100 years since birth or 50 years since death) are only accessible to spouses, domestic partners, parents, children, grandparents, grandchildren of the deceased or those with legal rights to the records.

In a recent response to a record request, I received a letter outlining additional DOH requirements.
Required information for Death Certificates:
  • Decedents first and last name
  • Date of Death - or provide 3-year range
  • Mother's first and maiden name
  • Father's first and last name
  • Social Security number
If the information is not available, please provide at last 3 of the items below AND include the entitled party's email address so that we may contact him or her for additional information:
  • Decedent's date of birth
  • Borough of death
  • Last known address
  • Place of birth: home birth address, hospital, etc.
  • Birthplace: (City, State, Country)
  • name of informant
  • Name of cemetery or crematory
  • Funeral director/address of funeral home
  • Date of burial or creation

Quite obviously, genealogists have not been a consideration here. Many of the information items required are the items we are trying to determine through acquisition of these records. This has been a sore point with those researching in New York City for some time. That, plus the fact that unless one is a direct descendant, forget about acquiring a death record from about 1950 to the present. This is a bit arbitrary considering that death records from before then are readily and easily available to all via the Municipal Archives. And, of course, if the person died anytime between about 1962 and 2014 we should be able to find out their Social Security number and death date via the Social Security Death Index (freely available on many websites).

Now, DOH is proposing a new rule 207 to set a regular schedule for transfer of records to the Municipal Archives. Hallelujah! 

Oh wait ... one issue: this new schedule would come with increased restrictions on records access.
  • a birth record would become a public record on January 31st of the year following 125 years after the date of birth [a 25% increase], and
  • a death record would become a public record on January 31st of the year following 75 years after the date of death [a 50% increase].
They also mention that they are considering death record access of 50 years rather than 75 for genealogical purposes. It is a little difficult to see how that fits into all of this. The mention of this consideration in the proposed rule seems like something thrown in as an afterthought. 

One has to assume that access for "genealogical purposes" would be maintained with the same restrictions we now see, despite the fact that those restrictions are not codified in existing rule 207 nor in proposed rule 207. That is, no access to records unless one is a spouse, domestic partner, parent, child, grandparent, grandchild of the deceased or has legal rights to the record.

The City is taking comments through 24 October 2017 when there will be a public hearing. I suggest that all genealogists with interest in more recent NYC vital records submit comments. Those in the NYC area should attend their public hearing - in force!

I am working on the following draft comment for submission. Over the next day or so I will, as any good genealogist would, edit the text and add some citations for my contentions. I urge you to write your own comments and send them in to NYC DOH. Let them know we are listening and we care - a great deal!

I urge New York City to make birth and death records public and transfer them, on a fixed schedule, from The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to DORIS (i.e., the Municipal Archives). I also urge New York City not to adopt further restrictions on when vital records will become publicly available. With regard to potential identity theft, this proposed rule is applying a sledge hammer to facilitate installation of a thumb tack. The tool will do the job, but there will be extraordinary collateral damage with little gain.

For death records, I urge you to adopt New York State’s 50-year rule without restriction or, even better, adopt an open records option (similar to some other states).
The stated privacy issue is moot. The federal Privacy Act does not apply to those who have died. Probate law requires public access to probate records so that potential heirs may be fully informed. As a result, for many, basic death information is known.
The vast majority of stolen identities are from living people made vulnerable via their use of social media, use of credit cards or response to email spam. Identity theft using names of the dead is an extraordinarily small percentage of identity theft cases.
I believe open records, rather than restricted ones, are more likely to be helpful with regard to the dead. For example, if companies had accessible death databases and records, they would be less likely to accept credit applications using names of dead people. That was the original concept behind the Death Master Index (Social Security Death Index). A few years ago,changes to availability of the updated index were made supposedly for protection of PII, but even then, the restriction is only for a few years after death - not 125 years after birth!

While the proposed rule's story of protecting a living mother’s dead child’s record, may tug at the heart strings, I urge you to also think about an equally compelling and much more common situation: there are many more people who die without issue. Under current NYC restrictions imposed by the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, no relatives but parents, grandparents, direct descendants or siblings may acquire death records even if those records are more than 50 years old. It is impossible for anyone, including caring relatives, to acquire the records necessary to allow adequate remembrance of their dearly loved aunts, uncles and cousins. This is not only ridiculous, but also unconscionable. Certainly, there are many more records for people in this category than for the child and mother in the proposal's hypothetical example.

With regard to the proposal to increase birth record restrictions, it is important to note that nearly all of the Personally Identifiable Information (PII) on birth records is readily available for everyone to find via the Internet. Birth records, themselves, are not the reason this information is available online. This information is available because it has been required by many government and private organizations for credit and land transactions and is available publicly. Or, the information may have been stolen during any one of many recent company and government agency data breaches. The PII DOH is proposing to protect via vital record access restrictions is already publicly available. Restricting birth records up to 100 years in New York City will not change this situation in any way.

It is also important to note that, by the statistics provided in the proposed rule regarding birth records, those over 100 years old make up but 0.4 % of the New York City population. This  NYC-led sledge hammer-like approach to a miniscule issue is stunning. It, like the proposal for death records, indicates a callous disregard for public access and government accountability.
Perhaps a better solution that would address both DOH and open records concerns would be to make death records open to the public (or only closed for 5 years) and birth records for those under 100 publicly available without restriction to those who can show with a death record, an obituary, a gravestone photo or a Social Security Death Index record that the subject of the birth record is deceased.
Many jurisdictions throughout the United States have open records laws, much more liberal that New York City. New York City has been more restrictive than New York State for some time with little or no explanation to the public for this difference and with no discernible advantage for PII protection. Unlike New York City, New York State and many other jurisdictions do not seem to view further restriction on public access in the public interest.

I would hope that actions with regard to further public record restrictions would be weighed seriously and considered with regard to whether the solutions proposed will have any impact on the problems identified. I suggest the solutions are draconian and unwarranted and, most importantly, will have no effect on the identified issue of privacy.

12 September 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: Rose Blumenfeld, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

In discussing the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association [the community association for NYC immigrants from Lubin (aka Labun, Russian Empire)], I have mentioned Rose Blumenfeld previously in three posts: 19 February 2015, 21 May 2015, and 28 May 2015.

Rose served as President of the First Lubiner Ladies Auxiliary in, at least, 1949.

Here lies
A modest and important woman
Mrs. Raizel daughter of Tzvi
Died 28 Nisan 5716
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living
----------
ROSE
BLUMENFELD
BELOVED MOTHER
GRANDMOTHER
AND GREAT
GRANDMOTHER
DIED APR. 9, 1956
AGE 79 YEARS 

Rose Levy was born in Labun in about 1876 to Isaac Levy and Mollie Cohen.[1] She married Benjamin (aka Barnett) Diamond in about 1893. She was about age 17 years old.[2] Benjamin was about 18 years older than Rose and this was his second marriage. He came to the union with four children: Nathan (born about 20 September 1875), Sophie (b. ca. 21 February 1887), Gussie (b. ca. 15 January 1889) and Celia (b. ca. 10 July 1892).[3]  

Benjamin emigrated in about 1895, shortly after the birth of their first child together, Ida (b. ca. 12 March 1895). Rose and Ida arrived in New York in about 1902.[4]

The family settled in the Lower East Side of Manhattan and had Eva (also called Adele) on 15 August 1904 and Mollie on 1 April 1906.[5]

The 1905 New York State Census found the family (Ben, Rose, Ida, and Eva) living at 245 Monroe Street. Ben worked as a tailor.[6]

Five years later, they were still in the same neighborhood at 249 Monroe Street. Ben was a machine operator in a shirt factory.[7]

Sometime between 1910 and 1915, the Diamonds moved to Brooklyn and lived in an apartment at 265-267 South 2nd Street. Benjamin was, reportedly, a dry goods peddler.[8]

Ida married Morris Groff, a medical student, in 1916.[9] The couple, along with their daughter, Martha, lived with Benjamin, Rose, Eva and Mollie at 909 Driggs Avenue, Brooklyn in 1920.[10]

While I have located neither a death certificate nor grave location for Benjamin, Rose's 1937 naturalization file indicates that he passed away on 18 June 1922.[11]

Eva/Adele married a furrier named William Weiner on 3 Novmber 1923.[12]

Daughter Mollie married Sidney Shapiro on 23 January 1924. Sidney was a milkman and later may have worked in a grocery.[13]

Rose remarried on 4 July 1925 to Nathan Blumenfeld who was also a widower. He was a grocer and immigrant from Iasi, Romania.[14]

For a moment, I thought I had a small mystery on my hands. I checked the "New York, New York, Death Index, 1949-1965," database on Ancestry and the index of this index showed that Rose had died outside of New York City.[15] I checked the images of the index page and found that, actually, she died in Brooklyn (The K in the borough column indicates Brooklyn. An X would indicate outside of the City.). I have entered a correction on Ancestry for the transcription of this index.

Rose's grave is located in Montefiore Cemetery, Queen, New York, in one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots in block 89, gate 156N, line 12L, grave 4.

Notes:
1. For her parents names, see: Kings Co., NY, marriage certificate no. 10117 (1925), Nathan Blumenfeld and Rose Diamond, 4 July 1925; Municipal Archives, New York City. For her approximate date of birth, see her naturalization petition: Rose Blumenfeld, naturalization file no. 221044 (2 February 1937), U.S. District Court, Eastern District, Brooklyn; "New York, State and Federal Naturalization Records, 1794-1940," images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 March 2017).
2. 1910 U.S. Census, New York Co., NY, population schedule, Manhattan, enumeration district 1693, sheet 14B, family 254, Benj. and Rose Diamond family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 March 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T624, roll 1008.
3. Barnett's Diamond, naturalization file 29790 (16 February 1917), New York State Supreme Court, Brooklyn, petition denied;  "New York, County Naturalization Records, 1791-1980," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89MX-MKHQ?cc=1999177&wc=MDSP-4WR%3A326204001%2C327733201 : 12 September 2017), Kings > Petitions for naturalization and petition evidence 1917 vol 120, no 29601-29850 > image 513 of 993; citing the Kings County Clerk.
4. Rose's naturalization record (see note 1) indicates she did not recall the port of departure or ship, but she did indicate she arrived in New York in July 1902. Thus far, no record of her arrival has been located.
5. I have not yet located Eva's birth record, but her birth date is documented on her father's naturalization file. Mollie's birth record: New York County, New York, birth certificate no. 17556 (1906), Mollie Diamond, 1 April 1906; Municipal Archives, New York City.
6. 1905 New York State Census, New York Co., NY, enumeration of inhabitants, Manhattan, assembly district 4, election district 18, p. 51, Ben and Rose Diamond family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 March 2017); citing New York State Archives, Albany.
7. 1910 U.S. Census, New York Co., NY, population schedule, Manhattan, enumeration district ??, sheet 14B, Benj. and Rose Diamond family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 March 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T624, roll 1008.
8. 1915 New York State Census, Kings Co., NY, enumeration of inhabitants, Brooklyn, a.d. 14, e.d. 4, p. 52, Benjamin and Rose Diamond family.
9. New York County, New York, marriage certificate no. 10550 (1916), Morris Graff and Ida Diamond, 5 September 1916; Municipal Archives, New York City.
10. 1920 U.S. census, Kings Co., NY, population schedule, Brooklyn, e.d. 3, sheet 15A, dwelling 1, family 10, Benjamin and Rose Diamond family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 March 2017); NARA microfim publication T625, roll 1149.
11. Rose Blumenfeld, naturalization file no. 221044 (2 February 1937), U.S. District Court, Eastern District, Brooklyn.
12. Kings Co., NY, marriage certificate no. 14602 (1923), William Weiner and Eva Diamond, 3 November 1923; Municipal Archives, New York City.
13.New York Co., NY, marriage certificate no. 5970 (1924), Sidney Shapiro and Mollie Diamond, 23 January 1924; Municipal Archives, New York City.
14. Kings Co., NY, marriage certificate no. 10117 (1925), Nathan Blumenfeld and Rose Diamond, 4 July 1925; Municipal Archives, New York City.
15. "New York, New York, Death Index, 1949-1965," images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 12 September 2017), entry for Rose Blumenthal, Brooklyn certificate no. 7025, 9 April 1956. 

29 August 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: Simon and Molly Neuman Smith, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

Molly Smith's parents, Samuel and Eva Neuman, were profiled in a blog post on 18 April 2017. In that post, I noted that in 1940, Simon and Molly Smith, along with their children Stanley and Herbert, lived with Molly's parents at 647 Sheffield Avenue, Brooklyn.[1] Simon Smith was working as a butcher.

SMITH
Here lies Malka Batsheva 
daughter of Simcha haLevi

MOLLY

BELOVED WIFE
DEVOTED MOTHER
DEAR GRANDMOTHER
MAY 29, 1911
JAN. 7, 1976
--------------------
Here lies
Yisachar son of Nachman

SIMON

BELOVED HUSBAND
DEVOTED FATHER
DEAR GRANDFATHER

MAY 21, 1908
AUG. 21, 1973 

Molly was born Mania Neuman in Labun, Russian Empire on 29 May 1911.[2] Mania and her mother Ryvka arrived in New York on 14 August 1921, more than eight years after her father immigrated to Chicago.[3]

By 1930, Molly, her parents and her USA-born brother Israel, lived in an apartment in Brooklyn at 44 Boerum Street. At that point, Molly was 19 years old and working as a salesgirl.[4]

Simon Smith came to the United States at (reportedly) age 10 as Socher Szmuc (pronounced Shmuts) and landed in New York on 9 July 1921.[5] He and his 8 year old sister Chaje (later, Ida) were accompanied by their 18 year old uncle Szmul (who later also took the name Simon Smith) and heading to Socher's and Chaje's father Nathan Smith at 345 Hancock Street, Bangor, Maine. All three Szmuc passengers were listed as last living in and born in Horodno, Minsk Gubernia, Russian Empire. Today this community is known as Haradnaja, Belarus. 

Simon's father, Nathan (Nachman) had immigrated to Boston in 1913, leaving behind his wife, Sore, and their children.[6] Sore must have died in the old country, because by the time Socher and Ida arrived in 1921, Nathan was married to a woman named Fannie and had started another family.[7] He was a cattle dealer in Bangor. 

Nathan's naturalization petition indicates that he and his children, Simon and Ida, were born in Pinsk.[8] Horodno was in the Pinsk uyezd (district), Minsk gubernia (province). So, identifying Pinsk district as their place of origin is consistent with previous records showing the community of Horodno.

I have to admit I giggled a bit when I saw Simon's original surname. Shmuts means dirt or mud. Alexander Beider notes that the name is common in the Pinsk area.[9]

According to Molly Smith's naturalization petition, she and Simon married in Brooklyn on 27 November 1932.[10] While I have located an indexed marriage license dated 21 November 1932 for the couple within Ancestry's New York City marriage license database, I have not yet located their marriage certificate in indices on Ancestry, FamilySearch or the Italian Genealogical Group.

In 1932, when Simon served as a witness on Molly's naturalization petition, he was listed as a barber. By the time of the 1940 census enumeration (April 1940), he was, as mentioned earlier, working as a butcher. 

The couple's sons, Stanley and Herbert, were born, respectively, in 1934 and 1938.

Simon and Molly Smith's graves are located within one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York, block 5, gate 567W, line 2R, graves 1 and 2.
 
Notes:
1. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-79, sheet 5A, household 79, Mollie Smith; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 April 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2548.
2. Molly Smith, naturalization file no. 300735 (1940), U.S. District Court, Eastern District of New York; images, "Final petition and citizenship papers (New York), 1865-1958," FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/988724?availability=Family%20History%20Library : accessed 27 August 2017); Naturalization records, (cert. no. 300301-300759) 16-20 Dec 1940, film 1,573,982, images 1736-1738.
    "U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 November 2015), entry for Molly Smith, January 1976, SSN 050-42-4414. 
3. Manifest, S.S. Lapland, 14 August 1921, list 21, lines 11-12, Rywka Neiman, age 32, and Mania Neiman, age 9; images, New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 April 2011).
    Manifest, S.S. Hannover, 13 March 1913, list 17, line 13, Simche Neumann, age 31; images, "Baltimore Passenger Lists, 1820-1964," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 April 2017).
4. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings Co., NY, pop. sched., e.d. 24-178, sheet 1B, dwelling 2, family 20, Molly Neuman; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 November 2010); NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1518. 
5. Manifest, S.S. Carmania, 9 July 1921, list 11, line 6, Socher Szmuc, age 10; images, "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 August 2017).
6. Manifest, S.S. Carpathia, 17 March 1913, list 91 [stamped], line 5, Nachman Schmutz, age 26; images, Massachusetts, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1820-1963," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 August 2017).
7. 1930 U.S. Census, Penobscot Co., MA, pop. sched., e.d. 10-4, sheet 16B, dwell. 242, fam. 304, Natan Smith; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 August 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 836.
8. Nathan Smith, naturalization file no. 1444 (4 April 1928), Supreme Judicial Court of Maine at Bangor, Penobscot County; images, "Maine, County Naturalization Records, 1800-1990, Penobscot County," FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : accessed 27 August 2017).
9. Alexander Beider, A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from the Russian Empire (Bergenfield, NJ: Avotaynu, 2008), p. 817. 
10. Molly Smith, naturalization file no. 300735 (1940), U.S. District Court, Eastern District of New York.

22 August 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: Abraham and Norma Orenstein Gootkin, Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, New York

It was Norma Orenstein Gootkin's family who hailed from Labun, Ukraine - the community associated with the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association landsmanshaft burial plot in Beth Moses Cemetery. 

GOOTKIN

FATHER

Here lies
Avraham son of Yakov Moshe haLevi
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living
ABRAHAM
BELOVED HUSBAND
DEVOTED FATHER
DEAR GRANDFATHER
15 FEB. 1905
29 DEC. 1970
--------------------
MOTHER

Here lies
Nechama daughter of Tzav haKoheyn
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living
NORMA
BELOVED WIFE
DEVOTED MOTHER
DEAR GRANDMOTHER
FEB. 2, 1906
APR. 17, 1986

Norma Orenstein was born Nechama Gorinstein in Labun on, perhaps, 2 February 1906 or 15 December 1906 to Feiga (Fannie) and Joseph.[1] Nechama, her mother and several siblings landed in New York on 7 November 1921.[2] The 1930 census indicates that her father immigrated in 1912.[3] I have not yet located his passenger manifest.

On 16 March 1935, Norma Orenstein married Abe Gootkin. Abe was the son of Jankel and Alte Gutkin and was born on 13 February 1905. His home town is likely to have been Lepel, Vitebsk Gubernia, Russian Empire (today in Belarus). I have not located his immigration papers, but his father's passenger manifest and naturalization records indicate he left his family behind in Lepel.[4] 

Abe's mother Alte died in the old country before immigrating. Abe immigrated sometime after his father naturalized on 25 June 1925, likely in 1927. On his father's naturalization petition Abe and other family members are listed as residing in Russia. A naturalization index card for Abe indicates that he had been in the country for two years on 2 July 1929 when he confirmed his naturalization via his father's papers.[5]

In the 1940 census, Abe and Norma lived in Brooklyn at 518 Pennsylvania Avenue. Abe worked as a window cleaner for buildings. He and Norma had one son, Jack.[6]

Abe's and Norma's graves are in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot, block 24, Maccabee Road  in Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, New York.

Notes:
1. Norma's Social Security Death Index record indicates the 2 February 1906 birth date. Her naturalization records indicate 15 December 1906.
   "U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 October 2015), entry for Norma Gootkin, SSN 099-03-7663, April 1986.
   Norma Orenstein, petition for naturalization no. 192948, 9 May 1934, U.S. District Court of New York, Eastern District, Brooklyn; images, "New York, State and Federal Naturalization records, 1794-1940," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 August 2017); citing NARA record group 21, Records of the District Courts of the United States.
2. Manifest, S.S. Scythia, 7 November 1921, list 34, line 22, Nechama Gorenstein, age 15; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 August 2017).
3. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-256, sheet 10A, dwelling 63, [no family number entered], Joseph and Fannie Ornstein family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 October 2015); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1542. 
4. Manifest, S.S. Cedric, 11 August 1914, list 10, line 29, Jankel Gutkin, age 47; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 August 2017).
   Jacob Gootkin, naturalization file no. 196938, 26 June 1925, U.S. District Court of Ohio, Northern District, Cleveland; images, "Ohio, Naturalization Petitions and Record Books, 1888-1946," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 October 2015); citing NARA record group 21, Records of the District Courts of the United States. 
5. "Ohio, County Naturalization Records, 1800-1977,"  images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K8HM-CZM : accessed 29 July 2017), Abraham Gootkin, 1925; citing Naturalization, Ohio, Cuyahoga, county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 2,247,341. 
6. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings Co., pop. sched., Brooklyn, e.d. 24-78, sheet 7A, household 129, Abe and Norma Gootkin family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 October 2015); NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2548. 
   "Norma Gootkin," obituary, Suffolk County News (Sayville, NY), 24 April 1986, p. 22; images, Fulton History (http://fultonhistory.com/Fulton.html : accessed 25 October 2015). 

15 August 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: Murray and Rickie Krakowsky, Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, New York

Murray Herman Krakowsky was the son of Abraham Krakowsky and Rose Schwartz Krakowsky. Rickie (aka Roslyn) Ensler Krakowsky was born in New York on 6 August 1915 to Rubin Ensler and Pauline Gross Ensler.

Here lies
Moshe Chaim son of Avraham
Pinchas haLevi
BELOVED HUSBAND - DEAR FATHER
GRANDFATHER AND GREAT GRANDFATHER
MURRAY
DIED DEC. 15, 2001 - AGE 89 YEARS

Here lies
Reikel daughter of Reuven
BELOVED WIFE - DEAR MOTHER
AND GRANDMOTHER
RICKIE
DIED AUG. 8, 1976 - AGE 61 YRS. 

It is likely that Murray was born on 30 July 1912 in New York City. That is the information provided in his Social Security information.[1] However, when his father, Abe, naturalized, he indicated that his only son, then called Morris, was born on 30 August 1912.[2]

I have located the indexed entry for Murray and Roslyn's marriage license application in the Bronx on 21 May 1938.[3] They likely married within a week or two of this date.

In 1940, they lived at 1424 Walter Avenue, Bronx, NY.[4] Murray was a fireman and Roslyn was a stock clerk at a ladies underwear business. According to his obituary, Murray served as a New York City fireman for 20 years.[5]

Murray and Rickie Krakowsky had two children: Flora and Robert.

After Rickie's death in 1976, Murray remarried. He and Gertrude P. Foreman applied for a marriage license in the Bronx in 1981.[6]

Public records indexes on Ancestry and FamilySearch show that Murray lived at some point in Lakewood, New Jersey. In the 1990s, he lived in Deerfield Beach, Florida. His last residence, according to the Social Security Death Index, was Highland Park, Lake County, Illinois.

Graves for Murray Krakowsky and Rickie Krakowsky are located in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot, block 24, Maccabee Road, Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, New York.

Notes:
1. "Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 April 2017), entry for Murray H. Krakowsky, SSN 124-10-2786, 15 December 2001.
   "U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 August2017), entry for Murray Herman Krakowsky, SSN 124102786, 15 December 2001.
2. Abe Krakowsky nat pet
3. "New York City, Marriage Indexes, 1907-1995," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 August 2017), entry for Murray Krakowsky and Roslyn Ensler, 21 May 1938, Bronx County, New York; citing Municipal Archives, New York City.
4. 1940 U.S. Census, Bronx County, New York, population schedule, Bronx, enumeration district 3-163, sheet 61B, household 199, Murray and Roslyn Krakowsky; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 April 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2464.
5. "Murray H. Krakowsky," obituary, Chicago Tribune (Chicago Illinois), 18 December 2001; online transcription, Legacy (http://www.legacy.com : accessed 18 April 2017).
6. "New York City, Marriage Indexes, 1907-1995," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 August 2017), entry for Murray Krakowsky and Gertrude P  Foreman, 1981, Bronx County, New York; citing Municipal Archives, New York City.