29 November 2016

Tombstone Tuesday: Chaye Sarah Stein, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

Chaye Sarah Stein, mother of Samuel Stein, was born and lived in Starokostantinov, Russian Empire (today Starokostyantyniv, Ukraine), but is buried in one of the Montefiore Cemetery burial plots owned by the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association (FLPBA). 

Here lies
Mrs. Chaye Sura daughter of Rabbi
Azriel Yehudah Yosef
Died 16 Shevat 5691
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living
CHAYE S. STEIN
AGE 84 YEARS

The date 16 Shevat 5691 is equivalent to 3 February 1931. She was buried the following day.

Labun (aka Lubin and, today, Yurovshchyna) is the community associated with the FLPBA. Starokostyantyniv is located about 32 kilometers (almost 20 miles) SSW of Labun. It was and the closest larger community to Labun. In 1900, Starokostantinov had a Jewish population of about 9,200, compared with Labun's 1,200. The larger community was a natural place for those from the more rural areas to migrate.
 
We may account for Chaye Sarah's burial in the FLPBA plot because of her association with her son, Samuel's, family: his wife Chava was born in Labun, as were all of Samuel and Chava's children.

Chaja Sura Sztejn arrived in the United States with her son, Szmul, and grand daughter, Lejka, on 8 November 1923.[1] She was a widow. According to the information on the manifest, she was 79 years old - that meant she was born about 1844 and she would have been about 14 years old at Szmul's birth. If she was 79 in 1923, then her age at death would have been about 87.
 
Her maiden name may have been Slawitz (or, perhaps Solowitz) - as shown on her death certificate.[2] Her mother's name was Molly [likely Malka] Ginsberg.

I have not been able to locate Chaye (who may have gone by Chaye, Ida or Sarah) in the 1925 New York State census. In 1925, her son, Samuel, was living with his son, Israel and daughter, Laura (Lejka) at 233 Penn Street in Brooklyn.[3]

In 1930, however, she was enumerated as Sarah living with her son Samuel at 172 Harrison Avenue, Brooklyn.[4]

Chaye's death certificate indicates she died of stomach cancer. Her doctor indicated he had been treating her since 15 June 1930. She died at home on Harrison Street. 

Chaye Sura was buried in block 5, gate 567W, line 1L, grave 1 in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York. 

Notes:
1.  Manifest, S.S. Belgenland, 8 November 1923, list 8, line 26, Chaja Sura Sztejn, age 79; images, "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 November 2016).
2. Kings County, New York, death certificate no. 3632 (1931), Chaia Sarah Stein, 3 February 1931; Municipal Archives, New York City.
3. 1925 New York State census, Kings County, New York, enumeration of inhabitants, Brooklyn, assembly district 4, election district 20, page 4, line 27, Samuel Stein; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 November 2016); citing New York State Archives, Albany. 
4. 1930 U.S. census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-185, sheet 3A, dwelling 18, family 62a, Sarah Stein; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 November 2016); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1518.
 

22 November 2016

Tombstone Tuesday: Samuel Stein, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

Samuel Stein did not immigrate to the United States until 1923 and, as far as I can tell, much of his family remained behind in Ukraine.
Here lies
A simple and honest man
Efraim Shmuel son of Yitzchak ha Levi
Died 28 Av 5708
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living
SAMUEL
STEIN
OUR BELOVED
FATHER
DEAR GRANDFATHER
DIED SEPT. 1, 1948
AGE 79 YEARS

Samuel was born on 10 March 1867 in Staro Konstyantiniv to Chaye Sura Solowitz (or Slawitz) and her husband. On his tombstone, his father's name is Yitzchak (Isaac). On Samuel's death certificate his father's name is shown is Israel.[1] 

In the Old Country, Samuel, then known as Szmul Sztejn, married Chava, who had been born in Labun (aka Lubin, in Yiddish). They had nine children in Labun who lived to adulthood: 
Gertrude (b. 20 September 1895), 
Israel (or Asriel, b. 18 July 1898), 
Nochim (b. 5 December 1902),
David (b. 24 October 1904),
Leah (b. 27 December 1908),
Freda (b. 19 September 1910),
Yochanan (b. 29 December 1911),
Henzie (b. 16 August 1913), and 
Shendla (b. 14 May 1915).
In his 10 December 1929 naturalization petition, Samuel indicated that his wife and the three youngest children still resided in "Russia." Gertrude, Israel, (possibly) Nochim,  Leah, and Freda lived in New York. David was in Cuba.[2]

Samuel had arrived in 1923 with his widowed mother Chaja Sura and his 15 year old daughter, Lejka (Leah/Laura).[3]

Szmul's occupation on the manifest was listed as trader. When he declared his intention to naturalize in 1926, he said he was a peddler. His petition for naturalization in December 1929, showed him as a Rabbi and the 1930 U.S. census, in Brooklyn living with his mother, indicated he was teaching at a synagogue.[4] On his death certificate, Dora Rosenbaum, identified as his daughter, said he was retired from selling dry goods.

At this point in my research, it is not clear if Samuel's wife Chava (identified as Eva on his death record) ever made it to the United States. After 1924 it became increasingly difficult to immigrate. We do know that Chava is not buried in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot near her husband. The only other Stein in the plots is Samuel's mother.

I have been able to track Sam and Chava's son Israel Joseph Stein. He married Fanny and had Ida, Lottie and Benny. Israel, a printer, died on 7 June 1995. While he was born and lived in Labun, he is buried in New Montefiore Cemetery in a Konstyantiniv landsmanshaft plot: the New Konstantiner Young and Old Society.  

Samuel Stein is buried in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York, First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot, block 89, gate 156N, line 7R, grave 3.

Notes:
1. Bronx County, New York, death certificate no. 8864 (1948), Samuel Stein, 1 September 1948; Municipal Archives, New York City. 
2. Samuel Stern, petition for naturalization, file no. 130899, 10 December 1929, District Court of the United States for the Eastern District of New York; images, "Selected U.S. Naturalization Records - Original Documents, 1790-1974," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 November 2016); citing NARA New York Region.
3. Manifest, S.S. Belgenland, 8 November 1923, list 8, line 25, Szmul Sztejn, age 65; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 November 2016).
4. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-185, sheet 3A, dwelling 18, unnumbered family, Samuel and Sarah Stein; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 November 2016); NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1518.

15 November 2016

Tombstone Tuesday: Abraham Rogel, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

Abraham Rogel's time in his new adopted home, New York, was fleeting. The 1910 U.S. Census and his death certificate both indicate he arrived in the United States about 1906.[1] He died in 1913.

Most of the inscription on Abraham's tombstone is deteriorated and difficult to read. The salient text indicates he was Abraham, son of Moshe.
 
IN MEMORY OF
MY BELOVED HUSBAND
ABRAHAM ROGEL
DIED FEB. 16, 1913
AGE 37 YEARS
REST IN PEACE
 
Unfortunately I have yet to locate a passenger manifest with his name.

Abraham, like so many immigrants associated with the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association, was a glazier and had his own shop. His brother's Samuel followed him to the USA in 1910 and also became a glazier.

Abraham's 1909 marriage certificate lists his mother as "Rebecca Bitz."[2] His brother, Sam's, marriage certificate lists Beckie Bych" and his brother, Nathan's, says "Becky Breich."[3] Abraham's death certificate indicates his mother's maiden name had been Geller - clearly an error.

Abraham married Sarah Feldman, daughter of Benjamin Feldman and Sarah Feigenblatt, on 28 February 1909. Sarah had arrived in New York as Sure Fellhandler on 10 April 1906. She traveled with friends from Polonnoye, Riwke Malzmann and Yetta Myers, my great great uncle Myer Myers' wife.[4]

Interestingly, Abraham and Sarah's marriage certificate lists their home address as 210 Grand Street. 210 Grand is the address of record (on passenger manifests) for several immigrants from Labun/Lubin. It was also the location of Lubin immigrant, Abraham Maltman's glass store.

In 1915, two years after her husband's death, Sarah married Abraham's brother Sam. Further information about them may be found here and here.

Abraham is buried in on of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots at Montefiore Cemetery in Queens, New York: block 89, gate 156N.  
 
Notes:
1. New York County, New York, death certificate no. 5265 (1913), Abraham Rogel, 16 February 1913; Municipal Archives, New York City.
    1910 U.S. Census, New York County, New York, population schedule, Manhattan, enumeration district 909, sheet 18A, dwelling 36, family 425, Abraham and Sarah Rogel; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 2 June 2015); NARA microfilm publication T624, roll 1033.
2. New York County, New York, marriage certificate no. 4666 (1909), Abraham Rogel and Sarah Feldman, 28 February 1909; Municipal Archives, New York City.
3. New York County, New York, marriage certificate no. 5140 (1915), Samuel Rogel and Sarah Feldman, 26 February 1915; Municipal Archives, New York City.
    New York County, New York, marriage certificate 16942 (1910), Nathan Rogol and Katie Sthamel,27 July 1910; Municipal Archives, New York City.
4. Manifest, S.S. Noordland, arrived 10 April 1906, list A, line 7, Sure Fellhandler, age 18; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 December 2015).

08 November 2016

Tombstone Tuesday: Zalman and Rachel Rochman, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

Tracking the lives of the Rochmans has been a challenge. 

Here lies
Our beloved father
an important and honored man
generous, saintly
Zalman son of Shlomo
Died 11 Iyar 5710
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living
----------
 ZALMAN
ROCHMAN
DIED APRIL 28, 1950
AGE 88 YEARS
----------
BELOVED FATHER
AND
GRANDFATHER

Usually when I do these short genealogies of Labun/Lubin townspeople buried in a First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot, I am successful in finding vital records, census records, directories, naturalization records, and the like, to track those interred to their immigration records.

This time, however, I started successfully with passenger manifests and, except for naturalization records for two of their sons, Charles and Aaron, I have been unable to to find additional linking records. 


DEAR WIFE
----------
Here lies
Ruchel Leia daughter of Arye Leib
Died 5 Kislev 56##
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living
RACHEL
ROCHMAN
DIED NOV.18, 1931
AGE 57 YRS
----------
GONE BUT NOT
FORGOTTEN 

I have not figured out where Zalman and Rachel died, where their children may have married, or where they lived in the United States - except for addresses shown on the few records I have collected via online access.

My usual sources for this type of quick study, online indexes for New York death and marriage records and census records, have failed me. I have searched Ancestry, FamilySearch, Fold3, indexes from the Italian Genealogy Group and the Brooklyn Eagle newspaper. Despite trying many variations of the surname, first names, dates of death, birth, etc. I have been unable to locate most usual family records. 

I did, however, find out a few things. 

Salomon Roichman, a tailor born in and most recently residing in Lubin, arrived in New York on 10 January 1913 aboard the S.S. Zeeland from Antwerp.[1] He'd left his wife Rochel behind in Labun. He traveled with fellow Lubiners Riwke Ferschman and her children David and Scharje, and Abram Task. The Ferschmans were headed to Riwke's husband (David and Scharje's father), Pesach, who was already in New York City. Abram's wife Leie was in Labun.

Like many immigrants who made the voyage just before the start of World War I, Zalman was in for a long separation from his family. Rachel and the children finally immigrated in 1921. 

Ruchel Rojchman departed Hamburg on the S.S. Mount Carroll on 20 October 1921.[2] She was accompanied by her daughters Ronia (age 19) and Mindla (17), and sons Szika (11) and Aron (9). They were reportedly all born in Lubin.

The address the family had for Zalman was 12 Garrick Street, New York, New York. They were detained until Zalman arrived for them. He was living at 52 Bogart Street, Brooklyn, NY.

I have locate naturalization records and death records for Zalman and Rachel's sons. 

Szika became Charles Rochman in the United States and was living at 158 Boerum Street, Brooklyn when he declared his intention to naturalize (November 1931), and at 262 Montauk Avenue, Brooklyn when he took his oath of citizenship in 1937.[3] He was single when he naturalized.

Aron became Aaron Rockman (note the difference in spelling). He lived at 72 E. 51st Street, Brooklyn when he declared his intention to naturalize in October 1933 and at 281 Fountain Avenue, Brooklyn between his petition (August 137) and oath of citizenship (September 1938).[4] Like his brother, he was not married at that time.

Charles died on 24 February 1993  in Hallandale, Broward County, Florida.[5]

Aaron died on 20 September 1969 in Los Angeles, California.[6] 

I have been unable to track Charles and Aaron's sisters. 

One bit of interesting information: I have located a man who was likely Zalman on a 1912 Voters' List for Labun.[7] My transcription of the entry from the Cyrillic text is for Zelman Duvid Roikhman, son of Leib.  

In 1912, men were only eligible for Duma voting if they were at least 24 years old and were further eligible because they had paid taxes, were in a guild or were professionals.[8] So, although Zalman said he was a tailor on his passenger manifest, he must have been of at least modest means before he decided to emigrate.

Zalman and Rachel are buried in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot in Montefiore Cemetery, block 89, gate 156N. Rachel is in line 4L, grave 3 and Zalman is in line 9R, grave 1. 

Notes:
1. Manifest, S.S. Zeeland, January 1913, p. 7, line 6, Salomon Roichman, age 40; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 12 June 2013).
2. Manifest, S.S. Mount Carroll, November 1921, p. 18, lines 1-5, Ruchla (age 46 [?]), Szika (11), Aron (9), Ronia (19), and Mindla (17) Rojchmann; images,
"New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 April 2011).
3. Charles Rochman, naturalization file no. 227952 (1937), Eastern District of New York; "Selected U.S. Naturalization Records - Original Documents, 1790-1974," images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 April 2011).
4. Aaron Rockman, naturalization file no. 236635 (1938), Eastern District of New York; "Selected U.S. Naturalization Records - Original Documents, 1790-1974," images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 April 2011).
5."U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 November 2016); Charles Rochman, 24 February 1993, SSN 090-28-7210, Hallandale, Broward County, Florida.
6. "U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 November 2016); Aaron Rockman, September 1969, SSN 073-20-6581.
  "California, Death Index, 1940-1997," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 6 November 2016).
7. Voter Lists, Labun, Izyaslav Raion, Khmelnitskiy Oblast, State Archives of Zhitomir Oblast, Fond 502, Op. 1.
8. "Duma Voter List FAQ," JewishGen (http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/lists/duma.htm : accessed 7 November 2016).
 

01 November 2016

Tombstone Tuesday: Sam and Yetta Kurman, Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, NY

While Sam Kurman's parents, Harry and Yetta Kurman, are buried in one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association (FLPBA) plots in Montefiore Cemetery, Sam and his wife Yetta are interred in the organization's plot in Beth Moses Cemetery. 

Here lies
Schmuel son of Tzvi Hersch ha-Levi
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living
SAM
BELOVED FATHER
GRANDFATHER
GREAT GRANDFATHER
OCT. 5, 1889
JULY 8, 1967
----------
Here lies
Yetta daughter of Yisrael Avraham
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living
YATTIE
BELOVED MOTHER
GRANDMOTHER
GREAT-GRANDMOTHER
APR. 15, 1888
JULY 18, 1967 

Sam Kurman was born Schmiel Kurman in Labun, Russian Empire and immigrated to the United States with his mother and siblings in 1909.[1] His father, Hersch (Harry), had arrived in New York City with Schmiel's brother, Chaim, in July 1906.[2]

While Sam's father was in the clothing industry, Sam and his brother, Hyman, like so many Lubiners, became glaziers.

On 12 December 1915, Sam Kurman married Yetta Kaufman, daughter of Israel Kaufman and Minnie Goldberg.[3]

In 1917, Sam and Yetta lived at 205 South 2nd Street, Brooklyn.[4] By 1930, they'd moved to 1068 Newport Street, Brooklyn.[5] In April 1940, they resided at 491 E. 94th Street.[6] Two years later, they were at 79 Remsen Avenue, Brooklyn.[7]

Sam and Yetta had three children. Their first, Isidore, was born 13 October 1916 and only lived five days, dying 18 October 1916. Until working on this summary for Sam and Yetta, I'd been unaware of Isidore. He is not listed in the Montefiore Cemetery online database and I did not locate his grave when I recorded all graves in the two Montefiore Cemetery FLPBA plots. There are at least two possibilities: either his grave was never marked with a stone or a stone of relatively porous material was placed and has since deteriorated beyond readable (Since I have used an indexed record, here, there is a third possibility that the indexer did not accurately record the cemetery location. Although, considering that both Montefiore and Springfield Gardens was noted, I think this last suggestion is unlikely.).

The first inkling of Isidore's existence was the 1940 census enumeration of the family. Yetta was selected for supplementary questions and she indicated that she'd had three children. Since I'd only previously seen two documented, this new information sent me to New York City death records. 

FamilySearch lists an indexed  death certificate for Isidore Kurman, whose parents were Sam Kurman and Kaufman, in their "New York, New York City Municipal Deaths, 1795-1949" collection and indicates that he was buried in Montefiore Cemetery (Springfield Gardens). I will order a copy of his death certificate. 

The couple's second child was Miriam, born 18 December 1917. Sidney was born 14 September 1922.[8]

I have not been able to track Miriam, but I have located Sidney Kurman, who died on 8 October 1974, buried in Beth Moses Cemetery, as well. He is in another plot (block 5, row XF-XG, grave 31) next to his wife Edythe Kurman.[9] Their graves were photographed and reported on Find A Grave. I am particularly happy that someone not only recorded the interments, but also photographed the stones.

Sam and Yetta Kurman are buried in block 24, Maccabee Road, Beth Moses Cemetery, First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot.

Notes:
1. Manifest, S.S. Volturno, 12 November 1909, p. 8, line 11, Schmiel Kurmann, age 18; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 December 2010).
2. Manifest, S.S. Lucania, 28 July 1906, p. 14, line 5, Hersch Kurmann, age 40; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 December 2010).
3. "New York, New York City Marriage Records, 1829-1940," index, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : accessed 31 October 2016); entry for Sam Kurman and Yettie Kaufman,12 December 1915, Manhattan, marriage certificate no. 28620 (1915); FamilySearch microfilm 1,614,231; citing New York City Municipal Archives. I have not yet acquired a copy of the original record.
4. U.S. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 31 October 2016), card for Sam Kurman, serial no. 315, Draft Board 52, Kings County, New York; citing NARA microfilm publication M1509.
5. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-1234, sheet 24B, dwelling 138 [crossed out], family 573, Sam and Yetta Kurman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 31 October 2016); NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1493.
6. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-134B, sheet 11A, household 231, Samuel and Yetta Kurman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 31 October 2016); NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2550.
7. U.S. World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942," images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 31 July 2011), card for Sam Kurman, serial no. 1955, Kings County, New York; citing NARA (St. Louis) record group 147.
8. Sam Kurman petition for naturalization (1930), naturalization file no. 143654, Eastern District of New York; Record Group 21: Records of the District Courts of the United States; National Archives - Northeast Region, New York City.