29 October 2015

Treasure Chest Thursday: Abe and Norma Gootkin Family, FLPBA 1949 anniversary publication advertisement

I have not been able to determine much about Abe and Norma Gootkin prior to the 1940 census. They appear there in Brooklyn with their baby son Jack who was born in 1939.[1] They were both identified by Norma (the informant) as naturalized immigrants from Russia. Abe worked cleaning windows. 

While I have not located naturalization papers or manifests, I did locate their marriage record in the Italian Genealogical Group index of New York City marriage records (I have not yet ordered the record from the NYC Municipal Archives and I have not located it in the FamilySearch index). The index indicates that they married in Kings County (Brooklyn), NY and that Norma's maiden name had been Orenstein.[2] This information is confirmed by her obituary in the Suffolk County News.[3] Apparently, Jack was their only child.

Abe and Norma are the only Gootkins or Orensteins in any of the three First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association burial plots in the New York area (They are buried in the plot in Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, NY). Thus I have not been able to identify relatives whose immigration papers I might locate and I am unsure which member of this family, if either, was from Lubin or its vicinity.

Notes:
1. 1940 U.S. census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-78, sheet 7A, household 129, Abe and Norma Gootkin family; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 October 2015); NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2548.
2. Kings County, New York, marriage certificate no. 4251 (1935), Abe Gootkin and Norma Orenstein, 16 March 1935; index, "New York City Grooms Record Index," Italian Genealogical Group (http://italiangen.org/ : accessed 25 October 2015).
3. "Norma Gootkin," Suffolk County News (Sayville, NY), 24 April 1986, p. 22; digital image, Old Fulton New York Postcards (http://fultonhistory.com/Fulton.html : accessed 25 October 2015).

27 October 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Jack and Edna Lerner, Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn NY

Block 24, Maccabee Road, Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, NY
I wrote a bit about Jack and Edna and their family in the last post. So, this one will be short.

Jack was among at least three children (Jack, Sylvia and Esther) of Froim (Frank) and Rachma (Rose) Lerner who became immigrants in New York City. I have yet to determine where Jack was born (Edna was from Lomza, Poland).[1] Jack's father Froim's last residence in the old country had been in Labun (Lubin) before he left his family behind and immigrated to the USA in 1913.[2] Froim indicated he'd been born in Staro Konstyantiniv.

LERNER
Here lies
Yechezkeil son of Efraim
Died 26 Adar I 5755
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living
JACK
BELOVED HUSBAND
FATHER
GRANDFATHER
GREAT-GRANDFATHER
JUNE 2, 1905
FEB. 25, 1995
----------
Here lies
Etka daughter of Yisrael Ber
Died 8 Av 5757
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living
EDNA
BELOVED WIFE
MOTHER
GRANDMOTHER
GREAT-GRANDMOTHER
SEPT. 9, 1909
AUG. 11, 1997

Notes:  
1. U.S. District Court, Eastern District, Kings County, New York, petition for naturalization 208428 (9 October 1935), Edna Lerner; digital image, "Selected U.S. Naturalization Records - Original Documents, 1790-1974," Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 October 2015); NARA microfilm series M1879, roll 791.
2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 18 December 2010), manifest, S.S. California, Liverpool to New York, arriving 12 March 1913, list 9 (handwritten), line 16, Froim Lerner; citing NARA microfilm publication T715, roll 2027.

22 October 2015

Treasure Chest Thursday: Advertisement, Jack Lerner, 1949 FLPBA anniversary publication

I have to admit to being a softie for pathos, real or imagined. Records are, let's face it, pretty dry. It's our connecting dots and reading between lines that often evinces emotional reactions.

This advertisement in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association 1949 anniversary publication features Jack Lerner. Jack, born in 1905, immigrated with his mother and sister Sylvia to the United States in about 1921.[1] His father, Froim (Frank), had immigrated to the United States in 1913.[2] 

Lengthy gaps in immigration of family members during this time period were often due to disruptions caused by World War I and the Russian Revolution. Families left behind in Europe during war and occupation suffered, as those who'd made it to safety across the Atlantic worried. 

Once together, the family reacquainted and settled in Brooklyn. Like so many from Labun, Jack became a glazier. Lerner Glass was located at 573 Dumont Avenue, Brooklyn.[3]

In 1927, Jack married Edna Marcus (nee Etka Marczyk), an immigrant from Lomza. They had Irving (1928-?) and Raymond (1931-2009).[4]

I have a disheartening mystery with Jack and his family. He and Edna are enumerated together with Irving in the 1930 census.[5] But in the 1940 enumeration, Jack is shown with his widowed father, Frank, living with Jack's sister, Esther, and her husband Dave Lerman (a glazier), and children Louis and Evelyn.[6] Jack's wife Edna and their children were not living in that household. 

I have, I believe, located Irving and Raymond in Pride of Judea at 993 Dumont Avenue in Brooklyn.[7] While there is little identifying information on the census sheet, the names and ages of the boys seem correct. Pride of Judea Children's Home (an orphanage) was residence for 184 boys and girls when the census was taken in April 1940.

It is likely that the children were placed in Pride of Judea during a difficult time for the family. I have been unable to locate Edna Lerner in the 1940 census. 

Edna and Jack are buried side by side in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot in Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, NY. Raymond is interred near them, as well.

If it were my family, I'd contact family members to hear more about the situation that resulted in this apparent temporary family break-up. However, this is not my family - but one that emigrated, like mine, from the community of Labun/Lubin in the Russian Empire. One can only hope that they lived together again through better times.

Notes:
1. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-1222, sheet 10A, dwelling 17, family 231, Jack and Edna Learner family; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 October 2015); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1493.
2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 18 December 2010), manifest, S.S. California, Liverpool to New York, arriving 12 March 1913, list 9 (handwritten), line 16, Froim Lerner; citing NARA microfilm publication T715, roll 2027.
3. "Brooklyn Telephone Directory, Winter 1939-40" (Brooklyn: New York Telephone Company, 1940), p. 376; "Direct Me NYC 1940," New York Public Library (http://www.directme.nypl.org/directory/Brooklyn : accessed 22 October 2015).
4. U.S. District Court, Eastern District, Kings County, New York, petition for naturalization 208428 (9 October 1935), Edna Lerner; digital image, "Selected U.S. Naturalization Records - Original Documents, 1790-1974," Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 October 2015); NARA microfilm series M1879, roll 791.
5. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings Co., NY, pop. sch., Brooklyn, ED 24-1222, sheet 10A, dwell. 17, fa., 231, Jack and Edna Learner family.
6. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-2722, sheet 61B, household 270, Frank and Jack Lerner; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 October 2015); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2618.
7. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-2734, sheets 82A and B, institution Pride of Judea, Raymond and Irving Lerner; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 October 2015); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2618.

20 October 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Max Shenkerman, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY

Max Shenkerman, born in Labun, Volhynia Gubernia, Russian Empire, followed at least one of his children to the United States in 1923.[1]

Here lies
A man of integrity and uprightness
The wise Mordechai son of Pinkhas
Sheinkerman
Died at a ripe old age
The last day of Pesakh 5703
BELOVED FATHER
MAX
SHENKERMAN
DIED APR. 27, 1943

Philip Schenkerman (Max's son) immigrated in 1914 and was met by his brother-in-law, Michael Holzman.[2] Since Philip was single at the time of immigration, presumably there should have been another of Max's children, a daughter, also in New York City. Max's manifest indicates that his closest relative in the old country was another son, Hersch Szeinkerman, living in Lubin.

Max was reportedly 65 when he arrived in 1923 New York Harbor, so he would have been about 85 when he died in 1943 - a relatively ripe old age.

The last day of Pesakh (Passover) is 22 Nisan. In 1943 that would have corresponded to 27 April.

I was unsure about the meaning of the abbreviation that starts the third line (before Mordechai). Robin Meltzer replied to my query on Tracing the Tribe Face Book page that this likely means either "ha chacham" (the wise) or "ha chasid." Either would indicate a traditionally observant man who was, likely, very learned. 

Max likely named his son Philip after Max's father, Pinkhas.

Max was a widower when he arrived at Ellis Island. His son Philip's marriage record, shows his mother's name (presumably Max's late wife) had been Dora Kopetz.[3] 

I have been unable to locate Max in any records between immigration and death. I have not found a death record in New York City. He is buried in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York: block 89, gate 156N, line 6R, grave 1. 
----------
I am indebted to not only Robin Meltzer, but also Lara Diamond and Karen Gross Rubin. They were all very helpful with this translation.

Notes:
1. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 19 December 2010), manifest, S.S. Minnekahda, Antwerp to New York, arriving 4 August 1914, list 8 (handwritten), line 25, Mordka Szeinkerman; citing NARA microfilm publication T715, roll 2357.
2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 30 April 2011), manifest, S.S. Vaderland, Antwerp to New York, arriving 4 August 1914, list 20 (handwritten), line 19, Puic Schenikerman, as indexed  [Peric Scheinkerman]; citing NARA microfilm publication T715, roll 2357.
3. New York County, New York, marriage certificate no. 14350 (1917), Philip Schenkerman and Sarah Tabachnick; New York City Municipal Archives.

17 October 2015

All warm and fuzzy: Finding success with JewishGen's and JRI-Poland's new fuzzy search

Fuzzy (from Pixabay.com)
Searching is definitely an art. And that art often involves working with and, sometimes, around the tools, restrictions and options offered on particular database-offering websites. The research goal is not only to locate records that were recorded and indexed correctly, but also to find those records where erroneous information has been introduced. 

Earlier this summer while reporting from the Jerusalem IAJGS conference, I noted that JewishGen.org and JRI-Poland.org had added fuzzy search options to their search parameters (actually, the organizations share search parameters, so they both changed to include the same options). I wasn't quite sure what fuzzy search would do for me. I can now report that fuzzy makes me happy. Fuzzy is a wonderful tool for working around transcription errors.

I've been collecting and analyzing records from people with the Wenkert surname from eastern Galicia. Wenkert was the maiden name of my great grandmother Bertha Wenkert Liebross (ca. 1867-1937, Brooklyn, NY) and her sister Perl Wenkert Ett (ca. 1850-1895, Skole, Austrian Empire). Their parents were Israel Hersch and Reisel Wenkert from Zaleszczyki. Beyond that, I run out of Wenkert relatives.

The lengthy gap between the Wenkert sisters' births seems to cry out for information about additional siblings. But, none are known.

Records I viewed at the Lviv Achives during my visit in 2013 indicate that there were Wenkerts in the Zaleszczyki area in 1820.

Alexander Beider, who has produced the seminal work on ononomastics (name origins) for the area, writes that the surname Wenkert has been found in Stryj, Zaleszczyki, Horodenka, Borszczow, Czortkow, Husiatyn, Tarnopol, and Kolomyja.[1] With the exception of Stryj (which is close, actually, to Skole), all of these are within close proximity in eastern Galicia.

So, I've developed a spreadsheet within which I am recording vital records for Wenkerts. I am reconstructing families and trying to see which towns they are from and how they might be related to each other. 

I thought I'd located all the records identified and indexed, thus far, by JewishGen and Jewish Records Indexing-Poland (which is hosted on JewishGen's website). I had been dutifully searching, sometimes using exact and other times using the Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex (Sounds Like). I would return to the databases periodically to see if salient records had been added.

Phonetically gives one access to the Beider-Morse Soundex (which provides fewer false positives and, therefore, a shorter list of alternative spellings).[2]

Fuzzy Match, directs search to include spellings with one letter different than what one had entered. Fuzzier Match provides results with two changes from the searched name. Fuzziest Match allows up to 1/3 divergence from the searched entry. 

A few weeks ago, in preparation for a short presentation for the Phoenix Jewish Genealogy Group on what new things I'd learned at this past summer's IAJGS conference, I finally tried the new fuzzy search. 

I found new records! Actually, not new records, but ones I'd not located before on JRI-Poland.
 
Several vital records for offspring of Frieda Wenkert and Chaim Bonuss were listed on my spread sheet. But I had no marriage record for the couple.

Fuzzy Match provided versions of Wenkert with one letter changed: Wekerl and Wenert. It was clear from other information provided, that these records were likely related to the same Chaim and Frieda Bonuss I'd located previously.

I was curious to see if the error in the Wenkert name was the clerk's or transcriber's. So, I looked at the digitized record by clicking on View Nearby Image. This takes one to the website for the archive in Warsaw in which the record resides.

Here's the Wenkerl portion of  Akta 24, the Bonuss-Wenkerl marriage record.

Years ago, those writing a t at the end of a word often brought the  line at the end of the letter up sharply and did not cross the t. This is the case here. The transcriber misread the letter as l. Thus, Wenkerl. If one compares the last letter in the name Scheindel (in the second to last line) with the one in Wenkert, it is easy to see how the error occurred. They look similar.

I now have a marriage record that tells me that Friede Wenkert was born in 1864 - about 3 years before my great grandmother, Bertha. I am still not certain if Friede is related to me (her father was Hersch Wenkert, but her mother was not Reisel, but Scheindel).

Transcription error also hindered location of Froim's birth record. Akta 156 (transcribed as Wenert) was originally written by the clerk as Wenkert. Instead of mis-reading a letter, the transcriber created a typographical error by leaving out the k. 

Fuzzy search to the rescue! I've located a delayed marriage for Friede and Chaim and an additional child, Froim. Both of these records had been inaccessible to me previously due to the options I'd selected and the options available to me in searching. I realize, in retrospect, that I might have located these if I'd used starts with as a search parameter. With starts with Wenk in the JRI-Poland search box, I receive 115 hits. That's really not too many to peruse. I imagine, however, that someone seeking a name with a more common first few letters (such as Lieb...) would receive too many hits beyond useful.

Blurry (from en.wikipedia.org)
For me, Fuzzier Match and Fuzziest Match on Wenkert and a couple of other tested names, did not result in good hits. But, they may work for others. So, by all means try them.

My only issue now is that it is not clear on either JewishGen or JRI-Poland how to provide corrections for transcription errors. I will likely wait to collect several errors and then send a note to whomever I can contact outlining my concerns. 

Notes:
1. Alexander Beider, A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from Galicia (Bergenfield, New Jersey: Avotaynu, 2004), p. 572.
2. For example, I searched for Wenkert in the Ukraine database on JewishGen.  Using Sounds Like search, resulted in 245 hits in exclusively JewishGen databases as well as the following on JRI-Poland: 40 in the Lwow Wojewodztwo, 69 in Stanislawow W., 80 in Tarnopol W., and 62 in Volhynia. For Phonetically Like I received 36 hits in JewishGen databases and 1 in Lwow W., 65 in Stanislawow W., and 32 in Tarnopol W. in JRI-Poland.

15 October 2015

Treasure Chest Thursday: Philip Schenkerman family advertisement, 1949 FLPBA anniversary publication

Philip Schenkerman was born in Labun (aka Lubin), Volhynia Gubernia, Russian Empire and arrived at the age of 19 in New York Harbor on 4 August 1914.[1] He'd left his father Motel in Lubin. Motel arrived, a widower, in 1923.[2] (Motel became Max and passed away in 1943 and is buried in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot in Montefiore Cemetery.)

Philip married Sarah Tabachnik on 9 May 1917.[3] He made his living as a carpenter. By the 1925 New York State Census and 1930 U.S. Census enumerations, Philip was working as a glazier.[4]

Philip and Sarah had three children: David (born about 1919), Rose (1921) and Irving (1926). 

Philip and Sarah are buried in the FLPBA plot in Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, NY. Philip died in July 1975.[5] Sarah, on 18 September 1961. 

Notes:
1. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 30 April 2011), manifest, S.S. Vaderland, Antwerp to New York, arriving 4 August 1914, list 20 (handwritten), line 19, Puic Schenikerman, as indexed  [Peric Scheinkerman]; citing NARA microfilm publication T715, roll 2357. 
2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 19 December 2010), manifest, S.S. Minnekahda, Antwerp to New York, arriving 4 August 1914, list 8 (handwritten), line 25, Mordka Szeinkerman; citing NARA microfilm publication T715, roll 2357.  
3. New York County, New York, marriage certificate no. 14350 (1917), Philip Schenkerman and Sarah Tabatznik, 9 May 1917; Municipal Archives, New York.
4. 1925 New York State census, Bronx County, enumeration of the inhabitants, Bronx, assembly district 5, election district 34, page 11, Philip and Sadie Schenkerman family; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : 11 October 2015); New York State Archives, Albany.
1930 U.S. Census, Bronx County, population schedule, Bronx, enumeration district 3-371, sheet 13A, dwelling 16, family 184, Phillip and Sarah Schenkerman family; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : 11 October 2015); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1475. 
5. "U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : 11 October 2015); Philip Schenkerman, date of death July 1975, 059-28-5010, last residence Kerhonkson, Ulster County, NY.

13 October 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Benjamin and Adell Norflus, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY

Adell Fetell Norflus was born in Labun (Volhynia Gubernia, Russian Empire), the daughter of Abraham Fetell and Fannie Boriss.[1] I identified one of Adell's brothers, Henry Fetell, in a previous post. Adell married Minsk native Benjamin Norflus in New York City on 22 February 1931. They both immigrated to the United States in the early 1920s.[2]

 Here lies
Adell daughter of Avraham
Died 5 Shevat 5735
ADELL
BELOVED WIFE
DEVOTED MOTHER
AND GRANDMOTHER
DIED JAN. 16, 1975
AGE 68 YEARS
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living

Here lies
Ben Tzion son of Moshe
Died 22 Shevat 5738
BEN
BELOVED HUSBAND
DEVOTED FATHER
AND GRANDFATHER
DIED JAN. 30, 1978
AGE 74 YEARS
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living

Ben's voyage from Europe to New York included about five years spent in Buenos Aires before immigration in New York. 

Ben's brother Joseph also married a Labun native (Fannie Kargman) and Joseph and Fannie Norflus were buried in Montefiore Cemetery, as well. 

Early in his time in New York, Ben was a shoe worker. By the 1940 Census, however, he became  glazier like his brother Joseph and many other immigrants with ties to Labun.[3] He had is own store.

Ben and Adell had two children: a son, Albert, who was born about 1931 and a daughter born after the 1940 census was enumerated. 

Adell and Ben Norflus are buried in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York, clock 5, gate 567W, line 3L, graves 5 and 6.
 
Notes:
1. New York County, New York, marriage certificate no. 4217 (1931), Benjamin Norflus and Adell Fetell, 22 February 1931; Municipal Archives, New York.
2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 16 May 2011), manifest, S.S. Estonia, Danzig to New York, arriving 27 September 1921, list 2 (handwritten), line 30, Usla Fertel, citing NARA microfilm publication T715, roll 3028.
"New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 18 December 2010), manifest, S.S. American Legion, Buenos Aires to New York, arriving 30 April 1923, list 19 (handwritten), line 11, Benjamin Norflus, citing NARA microfilm publication T715, roll 3028.
3. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-2393, sheet 11B, household 210, Ben and Adell Norflus family; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 October 2015); NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2609. 

08 October 2015

Treasure Chest Thursday: Louis and Ida Feldman, FLPBA 1949 anniversary publication advertisement

Louis Feldman entered the United States at Boston under the name Leib Felgendler.[1] He traveled with his mother Feiga (Fannie) Barshak Felgendler and his siblings Abe and Sam and his cousin Jack Feigenblatt. A notation on the manifest indicated that Jack's parents had died. The family joined Louis' father Morris Feldman who had first immigrated to New York in 1904.[2]

Louis, a glazier, married Ida Bassowitz in Manhattan on 30 May 1925.[3] He and Ida settled in Brooklyn.[4]

They had Benjamin in March 1926 and Abram in July 1927.[5] Doris was born in about 1932.[6]

The Feldman family was actually from the larger community of Polonne, 10 miles northeast of Labun. Fannie's sister, Rivka (Rebecca) Barshak, was married to Labun native Avraham Malzmann (Abraham Maltman). The Maltman family emigrated to  NYC, as well. The Feldman family became active in the Labun landsmanshaft (First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Society) and several family members are buried in the Beth Moses Cemetery plot, Pinelawn, NY.

Notes:
1. "Massachusetts, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1820-1963," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 2 February 2011), manifest, S.S. Manchuria, Danzig to Boston, arriving 21 February 1921, list 8, line 22, Leib Felgendler, citing NARA microfilm serial T938, roll 260.
2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 12 February 2011), manifest, S.S. Belgravia, Hamburg to New York, arriving 1 July 1904, list 2, line 20, Moische Felendler, citing NARA microfilm serial T715, roll 472; Apparently, Morris must have traveled back to the old country several times before the family immigrated in 1921.
3. New York County, New York, marriage certificate no. 15244 (1925), Louis Feldman and Ida Bassowitz, 30 May 1925; New York City Municipal Archives.
4. 1925 New York State Census, Kings County, New York, enumeration of inhabitants, Brooklyn, assembly district 9, election district 9, page 3, entry 19, Louis Feldman; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 October 2015); New York State Archives, Albany.
1930 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-1199, sheet 36A, dwelling 374, family 869, Louis and Ida Feldman family; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : 4 October 2015); NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1511.
5. Louis Feldman petition for naturalization (1927), naturalization file no. 90126, Eastern District of New York; Record Group 21; Records of the District Courts of the United States; National Archives - Northeast Region, New York City.
6. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-951, sheet 63B, household 231, Louis and Ida Feldman family; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : 4 October 2015); NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2570.

06 October 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Joseph and Fannie Kargman Norflus, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY

Joe and Fannie Norflus were active in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association due to Fannie's birth and Kargman family connection with the community of Labun. 

 Here lies
Feiga Bluma daughter of Yosef
Died 12 Iyar 5718
FANNIE
DIED MAY 2, 1958
AGE 58 YEARS
BELOVED WIFE
DEVOTED MOTHER
 FOREVER
IN OUR HEARTS 
----------
Here lies
Yosef son of Moshe
Died 16 Tevet 5720
JOSEPH
DIED JAN. 16, 1960
AGE 67 YEARS
BELOVED HUSBAND
DEVOTED FATHER
EVERLASTING
REMEMBRANCE
----------
UNITED
IN LIFE
UNDIVIDED
IN DEATH
----------
May their souls be bound in the bonds of the living
----------
NORFLUS

Fannie and her family (father Josef, mother Chana, and sister Sura Kargman) arrived in New York in 1921.[1] Joe and Fannie married in January 1926.[2]

Joseph Norflus died in Dade County, Florida.[3]

Notes
1. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 13 Dec 2010), manifest, S.S. Zeeland, Antwerp to New York, arriving 1 August 1921, list 16 (handwritten), lines 5-8, Josef, Chana, Sura and Feiga Kargman, citing NARA microfilm publication T715, roll 3001. 
2. Kings County, New York, marriage certificate no. 822 (1926), Joe Norflus and Fanny Kargman, 7 January 1926; New York City Municipal Archives.
3. "Florida Death Index, 1877-1998," index, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 September 2015); citing Office of Vital Records, Florida Department of Health.