28 May 2015

Treasure Chest Thursday: FLPBA Ladies Auxiliary photo, 1949 anniversary publication

Last year I received photos from two anniversary publications for the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association, the landsmanshaft society of Jewish immigrants from Lubin (aka Labun, Volhynia Gubernia, Russian Empire; aka Yurovshchina, Khmelnitsky Oblast, Ukraine). During the last several months I have posted items from the 25th anniversary (1936) publication. Today I start a selection of items from the 1949 anniversary. 


First Lubiner Ladies Auxiliary
Officers 1949 

Mrs. Rose Blumfield, President
Mrs. Dora Goldberg, Vice-President
Mrs. Esther Myers, Cashier
Mrs. B. Levy, Financial Secretary
Mrs. D. Pearlman, Recording Secretary
There are, obviously several women in this photo who are not identified in the list provided.
 
Dora Waxenberg Myers Alperin is seated, second from left. She was from Lubin; had first married Lubiner Louis Myers (my great great uncle); divorced him and then married Lubiner Jacob Alpern.

Yetta Myers, wife of Louis Myer's brother, Myer Myers (and another of my great great uncles), is seated on the far right. Her maiden name was Fell. Myer Myers was born in Lubin as was his and Yetta's daughter, Dorothy.  

I do not know the identities of most of the women in this photo. I have contacted a few Lubin community descendants to ask if their relatives are in the photo. If you can identify anyone in the photo, please let me know. 
-------- 
Of those listed as officers:
Rose Blumfield was previously identified in the 1936 anniversary publication. There is an unresolved (so far) question about her surname. It variously appears in records as Blumfield, Blumfeld and Blumenfeld. She is buried in the block 89, gate 156N plot in Montefiore Cemetery.

Dora Goldberg is not buried in any of the FLPBA plots and I know nothing about her.

Esther Myers is likely the woman married to Samuel Myers, Treasurer of the FLPBA in 1936. Esther's maiden name was Newman and, while she was from the Russian Empire, she was not from Lubin.[1] Neither Esther nor Sam are buried in FLPBA plots.

B. Levy is possibly Ida Sarah Levy. Her husband's name was Benson Levy (originally Liwak) - so the publication's compiler may have used Ida's husband's initial to identify her. Benson was an immigrant from Lubin. Benson and Ida are buried in block 5, gate 567W at Montefiore Cemetery.

D. Pearlman's first initial may also be her husband's. Lillian Perlman was married to David Perlman. They are buried in block 89, gate 156 N at Montefiore Cemetery

Notes:
1. Kings County, New York, marriage certificate no. 2284 (10 February 1917), Samuel Myers and Esther Newman, Municipal Archives, New York City.

26 May 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Reuben and Ray Dansker Minkowitz, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY

Rachel daughter of Tsvi

RAY
MINKOWITZ

BELOVED WIFE
MOTHER
GRANDMOTHER
APR. 14, 1898
JAN. 11, 1952
FOREVER LOVED

Last Tuesday, I posted about Harry and Ethel Dansker. Today we note the burial of one of their daughters, Ray, and her husband, Reuben Minkowitz. Like Harry and Ethel, they are also interred in one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots at Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY.

Ray or Rachel was born in Labun, Volhynia Gubernia, Russian Empire.[1] The birth date listed on her tombstone (14 April 1898) does not match that shown on her naturalization record (10 March 1897).[2] On the manifest for her arrival in the United States with her mother and siblings in June 1905, she is listed as eight years old.[3] That would calculate to birth in 1897.

Harry and Ray married on 6 June 1922.[4] She reported being 22 (for a birth year of 1900).

Here lies
Reuven son of Eileya
Died 18 Tammuz 5730
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living
REUBEN
MINKOWITZ
DIED JULY 22, 1970
AGE 78 YEARS

BELOVED HUSBAND
FATHER-GRANDFATHER 

Reuben was one of at least eight children born to Elias and Yetta Minkowitz. His father was a tea merchant in the USA.[4] Reuben, his mother and several siblings emigrated from Vilna, Russian Empire and landed at Ellis Island on 17 May 1904.[5]

Reuben worked in the garment industry as a cutter. He and Ray had three children who lived to adulthood: Sylvia (born 1924), Arthur (b. 1927) and Harriet (b. ca. 1937). In the 1940 census, Ray was one of the two people on her census page who was asked to respond to supplemental questions.[6] She reported that she had had four children - although only three are listed on the page. I have not located any listing for the death of a child of Reuben and Ray Minkowitz in New York City. 

Ray is buried in block 89, gate 156N, line 4R, grave 4. Reuben is in line 11R, grave 6.

Notes:
1. Kings County, New York, marriage certificate no. 6221 (6 June 1922), Reuben Minkowitz and Rachel E. Donsker, New York City Municipal Archives, New York.
2. Ray Minkowitz, naturalization petition number 184619 (1933), Eastern District of New York; Records of the District Courts of the United States, Record Group 21; National Archives - Northeast Region, New York City.
3. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 18 December 2010), manifest, S.S. Patricia, Hamburg to New York, arriving 16 June 1905, p. 40, line 6, Rachel Danzker; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial T715, Roll 589.
4. 1905 New York State census, New York County, New York, population schedule, Manhattan, assembly district 4, election district 12, sheet 18, Elias and Yetta Minkowitz family; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 December 2010); New York State Archives, Albany.
5. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 18 December 2010), manifest, S.S. Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, Bremen to New York, arriving 17 May 1904, list B , line 8, Ruben Mankowitz; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial T715, Roll 459.
6. 1940 U.S. Census, Queens County, New York, population schedule, Queens, numeration district 41-635, sheet 6B, household 152, line 68, Ray Minkowitz; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 May 2015); NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2733.

21 May 2015

Treasure Chest Thursday: FLPBA 25th anniversary publication: sister members

On the past three Treasure Chest Thursday posts I've listed the 72 male members of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association (FLPBA) - the landsmanshaft organization for those who settle in New York City after emigration from Lubin (Labun), Russian Empire. Only a handful of female members were listed in the 25th anniversary publication in 1936. They all appear to be widows of members and may have been from Lubin, themselves.

Of those I have been able to identify, all were buried in the FLPBA burial plot in block 89, gate 156N in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York.
  • R. Blumfield - Rose Blumenfeld
  • Brawerman - likely Ida Braverman (widow of Isidore, who died in 1933)
  • Z. Goldberg - Zlote (Lottie) Goldberg (Bernard, d. 1925)
  • R. Klein - unknown
  • S. Moskowitz - unknown
  • D. Reitman - Dora Reitman (Morris, d. 1935)
  • I. Schachter - possibly Fannie Schecter (Shimon, d. unknown)

19 May 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Harry and Ethel Dansker, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY

Harry and Ethel Dansker were married in the Russian Empire and came to the United States early in the 20th Century, settling initially in Lower Manhattan and later in Queens.

Here lies
My husband and our beloved father
Tzvi son of Aizik Dov
Died 10 Kislev 5691
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living
----------
HARRY DANSKER
BELOVED HUSBAND
AND DEAR FATHER
DIED NOV. 30, 1930
AGE 69 YEARS
----------
FATHER

Harry was born in Labun, Volhynia Gubernia, Russian Empire (also called Lubin in Yiddish and today, Yurovshchina, Ukraine) in about 1865. His parents (as reported on his death certificate) were Isaac Dansker and Sophie Goldberg.[1] 

Ethel was born in Radzivilov, Volhynia Gubernia, Russian Empire to Yale Bresner and Pessie Gittleman.[2] 

Our beloved elderly mother
Etel daughter of Yoel
Died 15 Sivan 5707
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living
----------
ETHEL DANSKER
OUR BELOVED
MOTHER
DIED JUNE 7, 1947
AGE 90 YEARS
----------
MOTHER 

Ethel traveled to the United States with her children Mottel (age 19), Malke (17) and Rachel (8) following their father Harry. They landed in New York on 16 June 1905.[3] While I have a candidate record, I am not yet certain that I have found Harry's manifest.
 
I have located the family in the 1910 census living at 274-6 Henry Street, New York, New York.[4] Harry was reportedly an operator at a skirt factory. The family consisted of Harry, Zeitl, Mollie and Rachel. Son Mottel is not with the family.  The census record reports that Zeitl had had 7 children, only two of whom were still living. I have not found any other records regarding son Mottel.

Daughter Rachel married Reuben Minkowitz on 6 June 1922.[5] She reported that she, like her father, was born in Lubin. I have not located a marriage record for her sister Mollie. 

Harry's death certificate indicates that he had become a glazier. He is among many Lubin immigrants who took that profession in New York City. 

Ethel's death certificate indicates that she died at the age of 89. The tombstone says 90. But, the manifest for her arrival in New York indicated that she was 40 years old in June 1905. That would calculate to a birth year of about 1865. The 1910 U.S. Census provides information that agrees: she was listed as 46 years old in 1910. Based on this, she was probably about 82 years old at death.

There is inconsistency regarding the Dansker surname in Ethel's death records. Ethel's death certificate lists her surname as Dansky and Montefiore Cemetery has her identified in their index using that surname. However, both her and her husband's tombstones indicate that the surname was Dansker. That name is in agreement with the 1910 U.S. Census record for the family, Ethel's manifest and Rachel's marriage certificate. "Dansky" is a mistake on the Ethel's death certificate - a mistake carried forward by the cemetery.

The Danskers are buried next to each other in one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY: block 89, gate 156N, line 4R, graves 5 and 6.

Notes:
1. Queens County, New York, certificate of death no. 7008 (30 November 1930), Harry Dansker, New York City Municipal Archives, New York.
2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 18 December 2010), manifest, S.S. Patricia, Hamburg to New York, arriving 16 June 1905, p. 40, line 3, Zwettel Danzker; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial T715, Roll 589. 
Queens County, New York, certificate of death no. 11895 (7 June 1947), Ethel Dansky, New York City Municipal Archives, New York.
3. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com, manifest, S.S. Patricia, Hamburg to New York, arriving 16 June 1905, p. 40, Zwettel Danzker.
4. New York County, New York, 1910 U.S. Census, population schedule, Manhattan, enumeration district 91, sheet 1A, dwelling 1, family 5, Harry and Zeitl Donsker; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 May 2015); citing NARA microfilm publication T624, roll 1008.
5. Kings County, New York, marriage certificate no. 6221 (6 June 1922), Reuben Minkowitz and Rachel E. Donsker, New York City Municipal Archives, New York.

14 May 2015

Treasure Chest Thursday: FLPBA members, 25th anniversary publication (part 3)

There were 72 members of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association listed in the 25th anniversary (1936) publication celebrating the group's founding.  

Two weeks ago I posted the entire membership page, showing all three columns of members and identified the members in the first column. Last week I identified the members in the second (middle) column. 

This week we finish up with the third (right) column. I have identified those buried in one of the three FLPBA burial plots: Montefiore plots at gates 156N [M-156N] or 567W [M-567W] and Beth Moses [Beth].
  • J. Norflus - Joseph Norflus [M-156N]
  • D. Perleman - David Perlman [M-156N]
  • S. Rogol - Samuel Rogel [M-156N]
  • N. Rogol - Nathan Rogel
  • S. Rosenthal - Samuel Rosenthal [M-156N]
  • W. Rosenthal - William Rosenthal [M-156N]
  • J. Reitman - Julius Reitman
  • S. Reitman - Samuel Reitman
  • N. Reitman - 
  • J. Rothman - Joe Rothman [M-567W]
  • A. Schwartz - Alex Schwartz [Beth]
  • M. Schachter - Max Schechter [M156N]
  • M. Schultz - Meyer Schultz [M-156N]
  • A. Sotskess - Abraham Sotskess [M-397N; United Old Konstantin Benevolent Society*]
  • S. Stern - 
  • I. Simon - Israel Simon [M-156N]
  • A. Schechnowetzky - Aaron Sachnowetsky
  • M. Schuekerman - Max Shenkerman [M-156N]
  • Z. Stein - Samuel Stein [M-156N]
  • L. Waxenberg - Louis Waxenberg [M-156N]
  • M. Weiss - Michael Weiss [M-567W]
----------------------
* Abraham Sotskess' wife (my great great aunt, Rebecca Myers Sotskess) is buried in an FLPBA plot but, for some reason, Abraham, who died a few years later, is in the plot for members of the Staro Konstyantiniv landsmanshaft at Montefiore Cemetery.

12 May 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Sam and Sophie Schwartz, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY

Sam Schwartz is the third of three Sam Schwartz, glaziers, I have recorded in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots at Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY.
 
Here lies
Shlomo son of Arye Dov
Died 21 Kislev 5684
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living
-----
Beloved Husband
and Father
SAM SCHWARTZ
Died Nov. 29, 1923
Age 43 Years

This Sam Schwartz was married to Sophie.
 
SOPHIE
OUR BELOVED MOTHER
JULY 5, 1886 - MAR. 31, 1949
Sosya bat Yehudah

Sam and Sophie married in Europe and emigrated before 1909. Sam traveled first and Sophie emigrated with their eldest daughter, Sadie or Shirley (who had been born about 1905).[1]

In the New York City, Sam and Sophie had: Isidore (b. ca. 1909), Pauline (b. ca. 1910), Ida (b. ca. 1912) and Noah (b. ca. 1918). 

Sophie's grave is in Momtefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY, First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot, block 89, gate 156N, line 7L, grave 3. Sam's grave is also in block 89, gate 156N. Beyond that, I have not been able to tell the cemetery's designation for his grave.

Notes:
1. 1910 United States Census, New York County, New York, population schedule, Manhattan, enumeration district 951, sheet 6B, dwelling 21, family 179, Sam and Sophie Schwartz family; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 January 2011); NARA microfilm publication T624, roll 1035.

10 May 2015

Happy Mother's Day, L2a1l2a!

Happy Mother's Day to my late mother Norma, grandmother Tillie, great grandmother Bertha and my great great grandmother Reisel!


Bertha Wenkert Liebross
I do not know the maiden name of my great great grandmother Reisel Wenkert from the Zaleszczyki area of today's Ukraine but among her children was my great grandmother, Breindel Wenkert, born about 1868. 

I know Breindel had one elder sister, Perl Wenkert Ett, who died in Skole, Austria in 1895. Perl had five daughters, all of whom bore daughters, as well (she also had a son, but that information is not helpful for following out MtDNA results). Beyond Perl and Breindel, I do not yet know of any other siblings.

Breindel married Eliezer (Leiser) Liebross. They resided in Radautz, Austrian Empire (now Radauti, Romania) and had eight children. 

Leiser and Breindel  immigrated in 1897 and 1898, respectively, and became Louis and Bertha Liebross in New York City.

Tillie Liebross Wilson
Their eldest child was my grandmother Tillie (born about 1888 in Radautz). Tillie attended school through the eighth grade. She married Joseph Wilson in 1917 in New York City. Of Louis and Bertha's three daughters, Tillie was the only one to bear children who lived to adulthood.

Tillie was not the stereo-typical white-haired grandmother. While she was doting and a superb cook, she dyed her hair to match her former auburn locks. She was ten when she became an immigrant and in later years did not have an accent from the Old Country. I think this photo (at left) really shows her as stylish woman.

Joe and Tillie's second child was my mother Norma Circe Wilson, born in Brooklyn in 1921. The Wilson's did well financially and purchased their two-family home in Brooklyn at 31 Colin Place. 

Me and my mother Norma Wilson Garber (about 1977)
Both Norma and her brother Ira attended Lincoln High School and then New York University. Norma graduated in 1941. She worked as a bookkeeper for a few years before marrying Bernard Garber in 1947. She became a home-maker after my brother Jim was born.

Our maternal line mitochondrial DNA haplogroup is L2a1l2a. Unfortunately, our haplogroup is an exact match with 25 other people who have tested with Family Tree DNA. Thus far, there does not appear to be any discernible common ancestor among us.

07 May 2015

What's New?

Several genealogy bloggers post information when FamilySearch updates or loads new databases. This is a nice service, but I tend to look at FamilySearch and Ancestry myself each evening to to see what, if anything has been added. I periodically check other sites, as well.

Now, you may not be as diligent (read, "insane") as I, but you, too, can check for updates any time you wish on your favorite genealogy database websites. One only needs to know where to look - and it's different for each website.

Here are a few (not all) of my favorites which seem to add content with some frequency. 

FamilySearch.org

Click on the Search tab.

Then, click the Browse all Published Collections link. 
Wait a few moments for all the collections to load, then click on Last Updated in blue on the upper right side of the page.
You have now sorted the collections by date. The most recently updated will be first on the list. 

Unfortunately, one usually cannot tell from information FamilySearch provides which collections are completely new and which are just updated. If it's one I have checked before, the color of the link is a different color than the new ones. 
 

Ancestry

On my Ancestry home page I can scroll about half-way down the page to a button (See all new records) that gives me access to their updates page.
Make sure to select the geographical location of interest.

Alternatively (on nearly every site there's another way to get there), one may go to the Card Catalog.
Then, select Date Updated.
The resulting list will include labels describing the collections as either New or Updated.
If you hover your cursor over a database link, you will see a pop-up providing information on the date the collection was published by Ancestry and/or the date it was last updated. 
It might be nice to also see a description of what has been updated, but - oh, well!
 

Fold3

Fold3 makes it easy to locate their new records list under New & Updated Collections. But, beware: it is literally a moving target! It may scroll away from you before you can click it (I had that problem when I was trying to get a screen shot). 
In that case, click on the little arrow that appears at the bottom if one hovers over the scrolling window, and try again.

On the right side of the resulting page you will find a percentage estimate of how much of the collection is online at Fold3 for your researching pleasure. This is a nice touch and quite useful if you have been wondering why great-great-great uncle Ralph - whose ancestors have been so darn proud of his Civil War service - does not appear (yet) in the expected Civil War Widows' Pension collection.

Genealogy Bank

Genealogy Bank usually sends out a monthly update to subscribers with a list of new newspaper resources. But one need not wait to receive that. Just look in the upper right hand corner of the home page.
On the new content page asterisks indicate new collections/newspapers. One may click on the little arrows at the top of the columns to sort the columns alphabetically.

Newspapers.com

For new and updated newpapers, click on the "Papers" tab.
Then, click on "New & updated." One may sort through these by either clicking on the state(s) of interest or by using the check boxes in the state list, below the map.


In you're wondering, I have not found a new collections list on MyHeritage - although it may be that I just somehow missed it. Regardless, if they have one, it's not obvious. 

I do not use or subscribe to Find My Past. I have looked at their site and do not see a new content area.

There are some sites (including some of the ones discussed above) that allow researchers to specify searches only in records added after a specified date. That's a wonderful feature - if one keeps track of when one last visited.

Anything that allows us to follow the great boom in online records is a good thing.

Treasure Chest Thursday: FLPBA members, 25th anniversary publication (part 2)

There were 72 members of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association listed in the 25th anniversary (1936) publication celebrating the group's founding. Last week I posted the entire membership page, showing all three columns of members. This week I will identify the members in the second (middle) column. I have identified those buried in one of the three FLPBA burial plots: Montefiore plots at gates 156N [M-156N] or 567W [M-567W] and Beth Moses [Beth].
  • S. Kurman - Sam Kurman [Beth]
  • H. Kargman - Harry Kargman
  • L. Kargman - Louis Kargman
  • S. Koploff
  • F. Lerner - Frank Lerner [M-156N]
  • J. Lerner - Jack Lerner [Beth]
  • D. Lerman - David Lerman [Beth]
  • Ph. Lipshitz - Philip Lipshitz [M-156N]
  • S. Lerner - Shia Lerner
  • H. Maltman - Herman Molthman
  • R. Minkowitz - Reuben Minkowitz [M-156N]
  • B. Mutnick - Benjamin Mutnick [M-156N]
  • S. Mutnick - Samuel Mutnik [M-156N]
  • A. Morgenstein - Abraham Morgenstern [Beth]
  • S. Newman - Samuel Neuman [M-156N]