29 April 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Rebecca Maltman

Rivka Barshak, a native of Polonne, married Abrom Malzman of Labun in approximately 1895 in the Russian Empire.[1] After emigration in 1903, Abrom changed his name to Abraham Maltman.[2] Rivke became Rebecca Maltman when she arrived with the children in 1906.[3] 

MALTMAN
Rivka daughter of Benyamin
BELOVED GRANDMOTHER
REBECCA
OCT. 10, 1880
JAN. 6, 1968

Rebecca was the daughter of Benjamin Barshak of Polonne.[4] On his manifest in 1906, when Benjamin arrived in New York for the first time with his son-in-law Abrom Malzman, he identified his brother-in-law as Leib Feigenblatt.[4] The Maltman family has confirmed that Rivka's mother's maiden name had been Feigenblatt.

Rebecca and Abraham had two children: Dora (Dwoire) Maltman Goldstein (ca. 1899 - ?) and Irving (Israel or Srulek) Maltman (1902-19 December 1963). They lived at 210-212 Grand Street, New York New York for several years near Abraham's glass store. By 1920, they had moved to Brooklyn.

Rebecca became a widow in 1927. Her son Irving continued in the glass business and the family kept their store at 212 Grand Street, NY, NY.

Notes:
1. 1910 U.S. census, New York County, New York, population schedule, Manhattan, Enumeration District 790, sheet 21A, dwelling 25, family 429, Abraham Maltman; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 September 2008), citing National Archives microfilm publication T624, roll 1029.
2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 April 2009), manifest, S.S. Moltke, Hamburg to New York, arriving 7 January 1903, list 5, line 26, Abrom Malzmann, citing National Archives microfilm publication T715, roll 317.
3. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 16 July 2009), manifest, S.S. Noordland, Antwerp to New York, arriving 9 April 1906, list A, line 2, Riwke Malzmann, citing National Archives microfilm publication T715, roll 689.
4. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 April 2009), manifest, S.S. Moltke, Hamburg to New York, arriving 7 January 1903, list 5, line 27, Benjamin Barschak, citing National Archives microfilm publication T715, roll 317.

25 April 2014

IAJGS Conference Schedule is Online

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies Conference, this year to be held in Salt Lake City, Utah, has placed the conference program and presentation schedule online at http://conference.iajgs.org/2014/program_schedule.cfm.

One may look at the entire schedule, or search by speaker, day, time or general topic. 

I will be speaking on Tuesday morning, July 29 from 10:30 - 11:45 am on "Beyond the Manifest: Methods for Confirming One's Ancestral Origins."
When several communities in Eastern Europe have similar names and their names have been changed over the years, it may be difficult to unambiguously identify one's family’s shtetl of origin. Considering the investment in time and energy in researching one's family shtetl, it is imperative that one get it right. Yet we do not often apply rigor in identifying our family’s communities of origin. The genealogical proof standard requires rigor in our research methodology. With its application and a well-designed research plan, we assure that our findings are robust and our conclusions not easily challenged. Applied methodology with suggested genealogical sources and techniques will be explored. Resources will include landsmanshaft burial data, online archival material, and the Shoah Names databases toward the goal of providing tools and methods for confirming the location of one's family shtetl in Eastern Europe.
I look forward to seeing you at the conference!

24 April 2014

Treasure Chest Thursday: Adolph Rappaport's Declaration of Intention

Adolph Rappaport was married to my grandmother Tillie Liebross Wilson's first cousin, Clara (Khaitza) Ett. They married in 1903 in New York City. On, October 24 1913, in the Kings County Supreme Court,  Adolph declared his intent to become a citizen.[1]


I, Adolph Rappaport, aged 34 years, occupation button hole maker, do declare on oath that my personal description is: Color white, complexion dark, height 5 feet 5 inches, weight 150 pounds, color of hair black, color of eyes brown other visible distinctive marks none
I was born in Skola Austria on the 16 day of September, anno Domini 1879; I now reside at 94 Tompkins ave, Brooklyn, N.Y. I emigrated to the United States from Rotterdam Holland on the vessel Amsterdam; my last foreign residence was Skola Austria
It is my bona fide intention to renounce forever all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, and particularly to Francis Joseph, Emperor of Austria and Apostolic King of Hungary [stamped], of whom I am now a subject; I arrived at the port of New York, in the State of New York, on or about the 27 day of May, anno Domini 1900; I am not an anarchist; I am not a polygamist nor a believer in the practice of polygamy; and it is my intention in good faith to become a citizen of the United States of America and to permanently reside therein: SO HELP ME GOD.
/s/ Adolph Rappaport

Subscribed and sworn before me at Brooklyn, N.Y., this 24 day of October anno Domini 1913
Charles S. Devoy, Clerk of the Supreme Court 
---------------------------------------
There are several items of interest in this document. 
  • Despite the information specific to port of embarkation, ship, port of arrival and date of arrival, I have yet to located Adolph's manifest (or, for that matter his wife Clara's). 
  • Adolph's birth and pre-emigration residence location, "Skola," are of interest because they match my information on the location of the Ett family in 1894 (when youngest daughter Jutte Ett Barath was born) and in 1895 (when mother Perl Wenkert Ett passed away). Adolph and Clara married in New York, but, apparently, knew each other from Skole, Ukraine
  • Despite his intention to naturalize, I do not believe either Adolph or his wife Clara completed the process.

Notes:
1. Adolph Rappaport declaration of intention no. 34426 (24 October 1913), vol. 69, p. 426, Kings County Supreme Court; "New York, County Naturalization Records, 1791-1980," FamilySearch.org (https://www.famlysearch.org : accessed 24 April 2014).

22 April 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Israel Myers & Eva Weinstein Myers

Israel Myers was Jacob Myers' elder brother and the son of Zachary Myers and Frieda Kargman.[1] He and his wife Eva are buried in Montefiore Cemetery, Springfield Gardens, Queens, New York  in one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots: Block 89, Gate 156N, Line 6R, graves 5 and 4.

Photo by E. Garber, 7 September 2008

MYERS
Here lies
ISRAEL
1886-1940
DIED MAY 20, 1940
Yisrael Moshe son of Zakharia
Died
12 Iyar 5700
----------
Here lies
EVA
1894-1946
DIED JANUARY 1, 1946
Chava daughter of Rabbi Shoal
Died
21 Teiveit 5706
----------
Israel was born in Hritsev (Gritsev; 8 miles to the west of Lubin/Labun) and emigrated from Rotterdam via the S.S. Posdam on 23 December 1911. He arrived in New York Harbor on 2 January 1912.[2]

Unlike his brother and Myers cousins, Israel became a fabric salesman, specializing in silk and rayon.[3]

I estimate that Israel and Eva married about 1918 (I have yet to find their marriage record). Eva Myers was the daughter of Saul and Gussie Weinstein.[4]

They had two sons: Martin (born ca. 1918) and Stanley (born in 1926). 

Notes:
1. Bronx County, New York, Certificate of Death no. 4981 (20 May 1940), Israel Myers, Municipal Archives, New York, New York.
2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 27 July 2009), manifest, S.S. Posdam, Rotterndam to New York, arriving 2 January 1912, list 10 (stamped), line 7, Israel Maltzman, citing National Archives microfilm publication T715, roll 1793.
3. 1930 U.S. Census, Bronx County, New York, population schedule, Bronx, Enumeration District (ED) 3-110, sheet 18A, dwelling 423, family 342, Israel; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 September 2008), citing National Archives microfilm publication T626, roll 1466; citing Family History Library microfilm 2,341,201.
1940 U.S. Census, Bronx County, New York, population schedule, Bronx, Enumeration District (ED) 3-127B, sheet 10A, household 226, Israel Meyers; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 2 April 2012), citing National Archives microfilm publication T627, roll 2463.
4. Bronx County, New York, Certificate of Death no. 83 (1 January 1946), Eva Myers, Municipal Archives, New York, New York.

19 April 2014

NGS Conference Live Streaming

Last May I attended the National Genealogical Society (NGS) Conference in Las Vegas. This year the conference will be in Richmond, Virginia (7-10 May) and I'm going, virtually.

NGS will be live-streaming several presentations that one may watch from the comfort of one's computer (or other capable electronic devise) and one may purchase access to two tracks of offerings. The deadline for purchase is 30 April 2014, midnight. Click on the links, below, to see further information about each talk.


Times are in listed for the Eastern Time Zone.

Track One: Records and Research Techniques


Thursday, 8 May 2014

2:30 p.m. T241 – "Using Evidence Creatively: Spotting Clues in Run-of-the-Mill Records," Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS
4:00 p.m. T252 – "Can a Complex Research Problem Be Solved Solely Online?," Thomas W. Jones, CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS

Friday, 9 May 2014

8:00 a.m. F308 – "Using NARA’s Finding Aids and Website," Pamela Boyer Sayre, CG, CGL
9:30 a.m. F311 – "Disputes and Unhappy Differences: Surprises in Land Records," Sharon Tate Moody, CG
11:00 a.m. F321 – " 'Of Sound Mind and Healthy Body': Using Probate Records in Your Research," Michael Hait, CG

Track Two: Virginia Resources and Migration Patterns


Friday, 9 May 2014

2:30 p.m. F342 – "From Ulster to Virginia and the Carolinas," David E. Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA
4:00 p.m. F355 – "Researching a Civil War Soldier in Virginia," Craig Roberts Scott, CG

Saturday, 10 May 2014

8:00 a.m. S403 – "The Migration Triangle: Virginia, the Carolinas, and Tennessee," J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA
9:30 a.m. S415 – "A Treasure Trove of Rarely Used Records," Barbara Vines Little, CG, FNGS, FVGS
11:00 a.m. S425 – "Colonial Migrations In and Out of the Shenandoah Valley," Vic Dunn, CG

Purchase of access grants live streaming and three-month access to the stream files. In addition one will receive an electronic version of the conference syllablus. For members of NGS, it's $65 for access to one track or $115 for both. Non-members [oh, become a member!] pay $80 per track, or $145 for both.

For more information see the registration page at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/attend/live-streaming-at-ngs2014gen/.

17 April 2014

Treasure Chest Thursday: Sidney Liebross WWI Draft Registration Card

My mother was always proud of all the redheads in her Liebross family. My grandmother, Tillie, had red hair (auburn, actually) and, according to my mother, some of Tillie's brothers also had either red hair or beards. Unfortunately, without color photos or family recollections, it's not been possible to account for the redheads. Until now.

Of all the Liebross siblings (i.e., the brothers and sisters of my maternal grandmother Tillie Liebross Wilson) Sidney Liebross is the one about whom we know the least. He died young in 1932 and there is no one alive now who recalls him.[1]

Like all his brothers, he was of the age to register for the World War I draft.[2] As far as I know, he did not serve.


The items in red will be discussed further, below.

                                    Registration Card                 No. 229

1. Name in full: Sidney Liebross
2. Home address: 171 Melrose St., Brooklyn, New York 
3. Date of birth: Feb. 2, 1890
4. Are you (1) a natural born citizen, (2) a naturalized citizen, (3) an alien, (4) or have you declared you intention (specify which)? Alien
5. Where were you born? Buckawiena, Austria
6. If not a citizen, of what country are you a citizen or subject? Austria
7. What is your present trade, occupation, or office? Salesman
8. By whom employed? Rosengarten Bros.
Where employed? 15 E. 26th St., NY City
9. Have you a father, mother, wife, child under 12, or a sister or brother under 12, solely dependent on you for support (specify which)? none
10. Married or single (which)? Single
Rec (specify which)? Caucasian
11. What military service have you had? None
12. Do you claim exemption from draft (specify ground)? None
I affirm that I have verified above answers and that they are true.  /s/ Sidney Liebross

31-9-68-A                    Registrar's Report
1. Tall, medium, or short (specify which)? Tall
Slender, medium, or stout (which)? Medium
2. Color of eyes? Brown
Color of hair? Red
3. Has person lost arm, leg, hand, foot, eye, or both eyes or is he otherwise disabled (specify)? None

I certify that my answers are true, that the person has read his own answers, that I have witnessed his signature, and that all of his answers of which I have knowledge are true, except as follows ------------
                                                                      /s/Alois Fisher
Precinct: 164
City of County: Kings
State: New York                                       June 5, 1917

The place of birth should be Bukovina, a region of what was then the Austrian Empire, but now in both southwestern Ukraine and Romania. Sidney and his siblings were born in Radautz (now Radauti in Romania).

According to the 1919 Trow's New York Copartnership and  Corporation Directory, Rosengarten Brothers was a store at 15 E. 26th Street that sold "cloaks."[3]     

Sidney is described as "tall." I suppose this was possible, but the Liebrosses are not known for height. Most were fairly short. So, I'm not sure if this was an accurate description.

And last, but not least, red hair.

Notes:
1. Kings County, New York, Certificate of Death no. 16139 (5 August 1932), Sidney Liebross, Municipal Archives, New York, New York.
2. "United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-26583-12544-52?cc=1968530 : accessed 17 Apr 2014), New York > New York City no 68; A-Q > image 2773 of 3611; citing NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d).  
3. Trow's New York Copartnership and Corporation Directory (New York: R.L. Polk & Co., 1919), page 990; digital image, Google Books (http://books.google.com : accessed 17 April 2014).

15 April 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Jacob Myers and Bertha Myers

Jacob Myers, son of Zachary Myers (my great grandfather's brother) and Frieda Kargman, was born Jankel Malzman in the Russian Empire. The manifest for his arrival in New York in 1908 indicates that he had been living in and had been born in Volodymyr Volynskyy.[1] However, his naturalization record indicates he was born on 15 November 1890 in Gritsev (8 miles west of his father's town of Labun).[2]

Photo by E. Garber, 7 September 2008,

JM
Here lies
Yakov son of Zacharia
----------
BELOVED HUSBAND
AND FATHER
JACOB
MYERS
DIED OCT. 3, 1949
AGE 58 YEARS
----------
LOVED AND CHERISHED BY ALL
===============
BM
Here lies
Tova daughter of Meier
----------
DEVOTED WIFE
AND MOTHER
BERTHA
MYERS
DIED JAN. 19, 1954
AGE 62 YEARS
----------
NONE KNEW THEE
BUT TO LOVE THEE
==========================
Jacob became glazier in New York City and was in business with his first cousin Louis Myers.

In 1911 Jacob married Bertha Goldman, also a Russian immigrant. She was the daughter of Meier Goldman and Anne Chalewska and was born in September 1891.[2][3] 

Jacob and Bertha had four children: Beatrice Myers Hoffman (1913-?); Meyer Myers (1915-1916), Sophie Myers (1918-?), and Frederick Myers (1921 -?).

The Myers are buried in one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association landsmanshaft plots at Montefiore Cemetery, Springfield Gardens, Queens, New York: Block 89, Gate 156N, Line 8R, Grave 1(Jacob) and Grave 2 (Bertha).
 
Notes:
1."New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 27 July 2009), manifest, Zeeland, Antwerp to New York, arriving 24 March 1908, page 9, Line 7, Jankiel Malzmann, citing National Archives microfilm publication T715, roll 1084.
2. Jacob Myers petition for naturalization no. 93901 (1 January 1921), Eastern District of New York, Records of the District Courts of New York; digital image, Foold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : accessed 30 December 2010; citing NARA Record Group 21, Northeast Region, New York City.
3. New York County, New York, certificate and record of marriage no. 29954 (20 December 1911), Jacob Myers and Bertha Goldmanm New York City Municipal Archives, New York.

08 April 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Sarah Myers

In keeping with my recent theme of "who-were-these-people-anyway?" I today present: Sarah Myers - buried, like all my Myers relatives, in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association landsmanshaft plot at Montefiore Cemetery.

Photo by Emily Garber, 7 September 2008
MOTHER
Here lies
Sarah daughter of Zise
Died 9 Tammuz 5747
BELOVED MOTHER
SARAH
MYERS
DIED
JUNE 18, 1956
AGE 88 YEARS

Having access to these type of records is surely the gift of going to a cemetery,  photographing the gravestones in an entire plot, transcribing and translating them, and then preparing the information and submitting it to the JewshGen Online Burial Registry (JOWBR). I have several times been able to go back and find relatives among those interred - relatives I did not know I had until well after I'd completed the data collection project.

In this case, I still do not know exactly how Sarah Mogilevsky Myers was related to me. I do know that she was likely an in-law related to me by marriage to her husband, Elias. In trying to figure out my relationship with her son, Sam Myers (who is not interred in this cemetery), I was led to Sarah's identification as his mother and a possible relative.[1]

Sarah, a widow, arrived in the New York Harbor in 1925.[2] She'd left behind a son, Israel Meyers, and joined another son, Schmuel (i.e., Zise or Samuel) in Brooklyn.[3]  

Sam had arrived as Zise Meyers in New York in 1912 accompanying Herschel (Harry) Meyers (brother of my great grandmother Sarah Myers Morris). Both Zise and Herschel said they from Lobin/Labin and were going to meet their brother, Louis Myers.[4] In fact, Sam was from Kamyanets-Podilskyy and was not a brother to either Harry or Louis.

But Sam, like most of the other Myers clan, became a glazier in New York City. 

Sarah is buried in Montefiore Cemetery, Springfield Gardens, Queens, New York, First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot, Block 89, Gate 156N, Line 8L, Grave 3.

Notes
1.  Samuel Myers, SS no. 109-28-2478, 1952, Application for Account No. (Form SS-5), Social Security Administration.
Kings County, New York, Certificate and Record of Marriage no. 2284 (10 February 1917), Samuel Myers and Esther Newman, Municipal Archives, New York City.
2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 17 November 2010), manifest, S.S. Veendam, Rotterdam to New York, arriving 7 June 1925, p. 1, Sarah Meyers; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial T715, roll 3664. 
3. Sam Myers was located at that same address when he was naturalized. Kings County, New York, Supreme Court, Petition for Naturalization no. 83870, page 20, Samuel Meyers, 1 November 1923; Municipal Archives, New York City.
4. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 23 November 2008), manifest, S.S. Noordam, Rotterdam to New York, arriving 27 August 1912, p. 2 (handwritten), p. 112 (stamped), line 5, Zise Meyers; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial T715, roll 1921.

04 April 2014

Soar like an Eagle! Then get some rest.

If you have Brooklyn, New York ancestors, a new source is ready for research. The Brooklyn Public Library (BPL) has just completed digitizing all Brooklyn Eagle pages 1841 through 1955. The images are hosted free of charge on newspapers.com.


For quite a while now the Brooklyn Eagle newspaper has only been available through 1902 via the Brooklyn Public Library website. 

The Old Fulton New York Newspapers website has the Eagle, as well, but more advanced searches requiring Boolean operators can sometimes be trying. On the new BPL Brooklyn Eagle site, while the search function does not allow much complexity, it does allow one to easily limit one's search by publication years or even by specific date. If searching on a full name or a phrase, put it within quotation marks (as one would in specific Google searches).

I entered my maternal grandfather's name, Joseph Wilson (in quotes) knowing full-well that I'd get too many hits: 1,748. 

I then limited the search by the years I knew he'd been in the United States: 1897-1955. I received 304 results. Still quite a few, but, in this case, I actually found him in the eleventh thumbnail. The words "knitting mills" caught my attention. 

Once one selects from among the articles found via Optical Character Recognition, one may then enter the word or phrase to see it highlighted on the page. If one clicks on the magnifying glass on the upper right, a small window appears. I typed in "joseph wilson" and the phrase was highlighted on the page.

This was a record I'd been seeking and never before found: the bankruptcy of my grandfather and his brother Benjamin Wilson. I always heard that my grandfather Joe and great uncle Ben had been in business with each other. My family's side (as told to me by my mother) was that Ben was a bit  profligate with spending and they went bankrupt. After that, my grandmother Tillie was the keeper of the household finances and my grandfather and his brother were never again in business together - even though they both continued separately (and successfully) in the sweater manufacturing industry.

Until this newspaper legal notice, I'd not known the name of the business or when they'd gone bankrupt.

The BPL site allows one to clip articles, save them to one's computer, one's Ancestry tree and/or print them. I decided to do all three. 

To clip articles one must have a user name and password or one may sign in through one's FaceBook account. I don't like sharing my FaceBook information with every company, so I took the username/password route.

To clip an article, click on "clip," above the image, and drag the box to enclose the area one wants saved. The white "(optional) add description" box allowed me to enter a full source citation to be saved with my clipping. The program actually does provide and attach most of the information one needs for a full Evidence Explained citation, but I wanted to put the citation in the proper format, as well.

"In Bankruptcy," Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 23 January 1928, p. 17, col. 7; digital images, Brooklyn Newsstand (http://www.newsstand.bklynpubliclibrary.org : accessed 4 April 2014).
Once I clicked on the blue "Clip" box in the lower right of the citation box, the article was clipped and I was able to save it, print it and post it in my grandfather's profile within my Ancestry.com tree. One may also share it with others and link to it from a blog or webpage from the clipping page.

The source citation I added (in all its EE-format glory) appears below the image on the clipping page. 

One more note: the webpage also has a search engine for a collection of photographs from the Brooklyn Eagle. One may access the search box by clicking on "Photo Search."
 
   Pretty sweet. Don't stay up too late.

03 April 2014

Treasure Chest Thursday: Jack Garber & Dora Morris marriage Certificate

My paternal grandfather and grandmother were first cousins from the same community (Labun/Lubin) in the Russian Empire. Dora Morris and her family emigrated to the USA in 1910 with her mother and siblings, more than four years after her father's voyage.[1] Her cousin, Jankel (Jacob or Jack Garber) arrived in New York in 1912.[2] He became a glazier like his uncle Isidor Morris and married Isidor's eldest daughter Dora on 12 August 1916.

New York County, New York, Certificate and Record of Marriage no. 19923 (12 August 1916), Jacob Garber and Dora Morris, New York City Municipal Archives, New York.


Items shown in red text are items I will be discussing further below.

[1st page]
Groom: Jacob Garber
Residence: 171 E. 101st St
Age: 21
Color: White
Single, Widowed or Divorced: Single
Occupation: Glazier
Birthplace: Russia
Father's Name: Abraham
Mother's Maiden Name: Anna Matziwitzka
Number of Groom's Marriage: First

Bride: Dora Morris
Residence: 243 E. 105 St.
Age: 19
Color: White
Single, Widowed or Divorced: Single
Maiden Name, if a Widow: [blank]
Birthplace: Russia
Father's Name: Isidor
Mother's Maiden Name: Sarah Myas
Number of Bride's Marriage: First
I hearby certify that the above-named groom and bride were joined in marriage by me, in accordance with the laws of the State of New York, at 210 E. 104th St, in the borough of Man., City of New York, this 12 of Aug, 1914.

Signature of person performing the ceremony:  
                              /s/ S. Ohlrauch
Official Station: 49 Clinton St.
Residence: 49 Clinton St.

Witness to the Marriage: Samuel Schwartz
                                              H. Thomashefsky

[2nd page]
WE hereby certify that we are the Groom and Bride named in this Certificate, and that the information given therein is correct, to the best of our knowledge and belief.
                              /s/Jacob Garber Groom
                              /s/Dora Morris Bride  

Signed in the presence of  /s/S. Ohlrauch
and 49 Clinton St.

-------------------------------
At the time of their marriage, Jacob was living with his brother, Max, and sister-in-law, Mary, at 171 E. 101st Street, New York, New York.[4]  

The ending on the mother's maiden name (Maziwitzka) is the female form of the surname. Anna's brother, Isidore Morris' original last name had been Mazevitsky (МАЦЕВИЦЬКИ). 

Dora's mother's maiden name was Myers, originally Malzmann (МАЛЬЦМАН).

S. Ohlrauch is the same person who married Jack's brother, Max Garber, to Mary Morgenstein a couple of years earlier. The signature on this form looks like S. Ohlrauch. I still have not been able to locate any other records for a rabbi with that name. 

It's difficult to prove with no address, but Sam Schwartz, one of the witnesses to the marriage, may have been a fellow countryman from Lubin and a glazier (there are several glaziers named Sam Schwartz from Lubin). Thomashefsky is a famous name from the Yiddish theater. However, I am not sure that this person was a member (or at least a close member) of that family. I have only looked at an indexed record (bad form, I know) on ItalianGen.org, but there was a Harry Thomashefsky (born about 1886) who married a woman named Jenny Morgenstern in 1909 (Manhattan marriage certificate 4869, 2 March 1909). Morgenstein was Max Garber's wife maiden name. So, it's possible that this H. Thomashefsky was Mary's brother-in-law. I'd have to order the Thomashefsky marriage certificate to develop some better clues on that.

Notes:
1. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 January 2012), manifest, Vaderland, Antwerp to New York, arriving 7 June 1910, p. 1, Sure Morris; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial T715, roll 1494. 
2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com
 (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 7 February 2009), manifest, Birma, Libau to New York, arriving 3 September 1912, p. 26 (handwritten), line 8, Jankel Arber; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial T715, Roll 1926.
3. 1915 New York States Census, New York County, New York, population schedule,  Enumeration District 12, Assembly District 24, sheet 19, number 4, Max Garber; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 August 2012), New York State Archives: Albany, New York.

01 April 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Abraham Maltman

Continuing my work with Malzmanns from Labun with whom I have not yet been able to establish a kinship relation: today I report on Abraham Maltman, brother of Benjamin Molthman.

Photo by Emily Garber, 7 September 2008
MALTMAN
Here lies
Husband and beloved father
Avraham son of Yisrael
Died 1 Pesach 5687
May his soul be bound in everlasting life 
----------
BELOVED HUSBAND
AND DEAR FATHER
ABRAHAM
MALTMAN
DIED APR. 17, 1927
AGE 55 YEARS
REST IN PEACE

Abraham Malzmann arrived in the United States from Labun in 1903 and like all the other Malzmanns from Labun became a glazier.[1] He settled at 210 Grand Street, which seemed to be a gathering spot for newly arrived immigrants from Labun. His glass store was at 212 Grand Street.

In 1906 his wife, Riwke (Rebecca) and children Dwoire (Dora) and Srulek (Irving) arrived via the Noordland from Antwerp.[2] They traveled with Jette (Yetta) and Dwoire (Dora) Meyers, wife and daughter of Myer Myers, who had also been Malzmanns, prior to emigration.

Abraham's son and daughter maintained the glass store at 212 Grand Street after their father's death.  

It is interesting that two brothers, Benjamin and Abraham took slightly different last names when they settled in the United States. But I have been assured by their descendants that they were, indeed, brothers. 

Abraham Maltman's grave is located in Montefiore Cemetery, Springfield Gardens, Queens, New York, Block 89, Gate 156N, Line 4R, Grave 2. 
 
Notes:
1. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 April 2009), manifest, S.S. Moltke, Hamburg to New York, arriving 7 January 1903, list 5, line 26, Abrom Malzmann, citing National Archives Microfilm Serial: T715; Microfilm Roll: 317.
2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 16 July 2009), manifest, S.S. Noordland, Antwerp to New York, arriving 9 Apri 1906, List A, line 2, Rivke Malzmann, citing National Archives Microfilm Serial: T715; Microfilm Roll: 807.