30 December 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Pesya Garber bat Shlomo Zelman, Labun Jewish cemetery

In June of 2013 I had the pleasure of visiting Ukraine and Labun (now Yurovshchina; once called Lubin in Yiddish), my paternal grandparents' community. We were able to visit the old Jewish cemetery, which I discussed in an earlier post. I illustrated that post with this tombstone and noted that the person interred in this grave shared my surname: Garber. I did not, however, also translate the rest of the epitaph.
[1#] Tishri 56[##]
1932
Here lies
a woman [of valor]
Pesya daughter of
Shlomo Zelman

GARBER

The date of death on the first curved line is worn away - although the number may start with י which would indicate a date between the 10th and 19th of the month of Tishri. The first two numbers of the year are clear: תר. But the last two are worn away. Just below the Hebrew date it clearly says 1932. Tishri in 1932 (the Hebrew year 5693), fell entirely in October.

The abbreviation for "here lies" (פנ), is split on either side of and slightly below 1932. 

Eishet (אשת), meaning woman, is clearly written, but the next word is mostly worn away. It may have been חיל , which with eishet would translate as "a woman of valor."

The letter mem (מ) before the name Pesya is an abreviation for marat (Mrs.). 

Above the surname Garber, carved in Cyrillic script, is an ornate G, also in Cyrillic. In printed Cyrillic, Garber would be written Гарбер.

As I 'd mentioned in the earlier post, I, unfortunately, have no idea who Pesya was or if she or her husband named Garber were related to me.

26 December 2014

Treasure Chest Thursday: First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association incorporation papers

When the number of Jewish immigrants from a specific community in Europe reached critical mass in their new settlement, they often banded together to form a landsmanshaft - a community benevolent society. In 1911, Jewish immigrants from Labun, Russian Empire (now Yurovshchina, Ukraine) who had resettled in New York City formed the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association. These incorporation papers are archives YIVO in New York City.



CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION
of the
FIRST LUBINER PROGRESSIVE BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION

(the word "Lubiner" is the name of a town in Russia)

STATE OF NEW YORK      )
CITY OF NEW YORK        :   SS:
COUNTY OF NEW YORK )
                    We, the undersigned, of full age, being desirous of associating ourselves together for social and beneficial pruposes as hereinafter is more particularly described, pursuant to and in conformity with Acts of the legislature of the State of New York, relating to Membership Corporations, do hereby certify and declare that we are all of full age, two-thirds of us are citizens of the United States, and all of us are residents if the State of New York.
                    We further certify and declare as follows:
     First:       That the particular objects for which said Corporation is formed are as follows, viz:
                    To engender good feelings and brotherly love among its members; to promote sociability among its members; to aid its members voluntarily in case of need and distress; to voluntarily provide for a suitable funeral and burial for its members in case of death; to institute and maintain a common meeting place where its members may gather at certain intervals or meetings for social purposes, and to adopt by-laws by which said Association may be governed.
     Second:   That the corporate name by which said Corporation bereby to be formed shall be known and distinguished is and shall be
                    FIRST LUBINER PROGRESSIVE BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION.
     Third:      That the territory in which the operations of said corporation are to be [line cut off on microfilmed copy]
     Fourth:    That the principal office of said Corporation shall be located in the City of New York, County of New York and State of New York.
     Fifth:       That the number of Directors of said corporation shall be five.
     Sixth:      That the names and places of residence of the persons to be the directors of said Corporation until its firth annual meeting are:
JOSEPH ROTHMAN                      178 Chrystie Street, N.Y. City
MORRIS SCHREIBMAN               30 Orchard Street, N.Y. City
LEO NATHANSON                        341 E. 82nd Street, N.Y. City
MYER MYERS                               41-43 E. 7th Street, N.Y. City
HARRY SIMON                              232 Bergen Street, Brooklyn,

     Seventh:  That the annual meeting of said Corporation shall be held on the first Tuesday of October in each and every year.
                     IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, we have made and signed this this Certificate in duplicate and have hereunto set our hands and affixed our respective seals this 29th day of April 1911.

/s/ Myers Myers
/s/ Joseph Rothman
/s/ Morris Schreibman
/s/ Harry Simon
/s/ Leo Nathanson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Twenty five years later, only Myer Myers (my great grandmother Sarah Myers Morris' brother) and Joseph Rothman were still listed as members of the landsmanshaft.[1] And both Myer and Joseph were the only members of the original directors who are buried in any of the three FLPBA burial plots in New York.[2]

Notes:  
1. "First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association, 25th Anniversary," photocopy of original booklet; original in possession of family of Julius Reitman, Massachusetts. 
2. All three plots (two at Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY and one at Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, NY) have been phtographed by the author. All three may be accessed online via the JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry

23 December 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Feiga bat Moshe, Labun Jewish cemetery

In June of 2013 I had the pleasure of visiting Ukraine and Labun (now Yurovshchina; once called Lubin in Yiddish), my paternal grandparents' community. We were able to visit the old Jewish cemetery, which I discussed in an earlier post. Over the past several Tuesdays I have posted photos and translations of tombstones from that cemetery. Most do not feature surnames.
 Died 19 [month not legible] 56[16?]
Here lies
Woman [unknown word] Feiga
daughter of Moshe
May her soul be bound in eternal life. 1855 
 ~~~~~~~~~~~
Reading and translating this  stone was particularly difficult. Issues with reading the stone are highlighted in red text.

נפ representing "died" on the first curved line is clear, as in the date, יט, which indicates 19. After that, however, the next words are unclear. 

פנ, "here lies," is written in large letters in the center of the stone. The next line below that seems to start with the word Eisha (אשה), which means "woman." Unfortunately the next word, likely an adjective describing this woman, is unclear. Her name is quite clear at the end of the line: Feiga.

The next line starts with bat (בﬨ), "daughter of," and is followed by the name Moshe (משה).

The last line includes the standard abbreviation of the phrase "may her soul be bound in eternal life" (ﬨנצכה). Interestingly, this is followed by a year written in Latin characters. 

Among those who looked at this on the "Tracing the Tribe" FaceBook page, there was disagreement about whether the number was 1955 or 1855. Both years would be unusual considering that the tombstones I have recorded in this cemetery seem to date from the 1910s through the early 1930s. The inscription at the end of the top curved line may serve to address the issue, however. 
1955 in the Hebrew calendar year is 5716 (ﬨשטז).  
1855 in the Hebrew calendar year is 5616 (ﬨﬧטז).
ﬨﬧ is near the end of the top curved line. Two characters that should represent the last two characters in the year are missing in an eroded area of the stone. 

If this is accurate, then we are looking at the earliest stone located thus far in the Labun Jewish cemetery.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Special thanks to Israel Pickholtz, Mark Jacobson, Lara Diamond, and Robin Meltzer (all posting on Tracing the Tribe FaceBook page) for their help deciphering this stone.  

18 December 2014

Treasure Chest Thursday: Marriage of Evelyn Myers and Boris Paull

Evelyn Myers, the daughter of Myer and Yetta Myers, was born in New York City. Her parents and elder sister, Dorothy, were immigrants from Labun, Russian Empire.[1] Evelyn's father, Myer, was one of my great grandmother Sarah Myers Morris' brothers. So, Evelyn would have been my grandmother, Dora Moris Garber's first cousin (and my first cousin twice removed).

New York County, New York, Certificate and Record of Marriage no. 11131 (26 April 1927). Boris Paull and Evelyn Myers, Municipal Archives, New York, New York.



Items in red will be discussed further, below.
 
[1st page]
Groom: Boris Paul
Residence: 925 57th St.
Age: 29
Color: White
Single, Widowed or Divorced: single
Occupation: salesman
Birthplace: Russia
Father's Name: Peter
Mother's Maiden Name: Sophie Freedman
Number of Groom's Marriage: 5430

Bride: Evelyn Myers
Residence:
904 58th St.
Age: 19
Color: White
Single, Widowed or Divorced: single
Maiden Name, if a Widow: [blank]
Birthplace: Russia
Father's Name: Meyer
Mother's Maiden Name: Yetta Fell
Number of Bride's Marriage: 5430

I hearby certify that the above-named groom and bride were joined in Marriage by me, in accordance with the laws of the State of New York, at 298 Madison St. NY, in the borough of [left blank], City of New York, this 26th of April, 1927.

Signature of person performing the ceremony:
                                                        /s/ Rabbi Yeor Lerner
Official Station: 63 Montgomery Ave
Residence: 298 Madison St., N.Y.C.

Witnesses to }  Harry Shapiro
the Marriage }  55 E. 11th St., N.Y.C.
 
[2nd page]  
WE hereby certify that we are the Groom and Bride named in this Certificate, and that the information given therein is correct, to the best of our knowledge and belief.

                              /s/ Boris Paull  Groom
                              /s/ Evelyn Myers Bride  

Signed in the presence of  /s/ Rabbi Yeor Lerner
                                                /s/  Vivienne H. Barg 

--------------------
There are several interesting errors in this certificate compared to information known from other records. For comparison purposes, I  located the marriage license application on microfilm at the New York City Municipal Archives. This is my transcription:
Kings County, New York, Affidavit for License to Marry no. 5430 (6 April 1927; marriage date 26 April 1927 [two marriage dates on form: 15 Apr and 26 Apr. Based upon what appears to be written on marriage certificate 11131, correct date is 26 Apr 1927), Boris Paull and Evelyn Myers; "Brooklyn Marriage Licenses 1927, 5,300-6,199," Municipal Archives, New York City, microfilm roll K1927-410 MN 36410; transcription made from microfilmed image.
The first issue is the marriage date. It is difficult to read the date on the marriage certificate. There are two online indices of New York City marriages: one on Ancestry.com and one on ItalianGen.org. Both indicate that Boris Paull and Evelyn Myers married on 15 April 1927. The marriage license shows two different dates. 15 April 1927 is noted in the upper right corner of the affidavit. 26 April 1927 is shown (twice) in the text, below, where Rabbi Lerner and the two witnesses signed. Based upon a comparison of the relatively unintelligible date on the marriage certificate and the date written in the body of the license, I believe that 26 April was the correct date.

Boris' surname is spelled incorrectly on the top of the marriage certificate. Boris consistently spelled his surname with two Ls. His signature on page two of the certificate includes two Ls. 

Boris was born in the Russian Empire. The license adds the additional information that he was born in "Kerson," Russia. This could have been the gubernia (province) or community of Kherson, located on the Black Sea. 

Neither the groom nor the bride has been married 5430 times (!). This is the number assigned to the application for the marriage license.

Evelyn Myers was born in New York City, not Russia. While I have not yet located her birth certificate, the 1906 emigration of her mother and older sister, and subsequent census records indicate birth in New York. Her family members have told me she was born on 9 October 1907.

Yeor Lerner had been rabbi in Labun. I've seen his first name spelled in other records as Yoer or Yaer. He became a immigrant on 11 March 1921 when he landed in New York City on the Cedric.[2] 

Harry Shapiro was Evelyn's brother-in-law, her sister Dorothy's husband. 

Notes:
1. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 16 July 2009), manifest, Noordland, Antwerp to New York, arriving 9 April 1906, page A, line 05, Jette Meyers; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial T715, Microfilm Roll 689.

2. Yoer Lerner, Petition for Naturalization (1929), no. 161152, Southern District of New York; Records of the District Courts of the United States, record Group 21; National Archives - Northeast region, New York City. 

16 December 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Shmuel ben Khaim Kaplan, Labun Jewish cemetery

In June of 2013 I had the pleasure of visiting Ukraine and Labun (now Yurovshchina; once called Lubin in Yiddish), my paternal grandparents' community. We were able to visit the old Jewish cemetery, which I discussed in an earlier post. Over the next several Tuesdays I will post photos and translations (as I am able to decipher) of tombstones from that cemetery. Most do not feature surnames.
[first one or two lines unreadable]
Shmuel
son of Khaim [last word unknown] 
Kaplan
May his soul be bound in everlasting life 

Not the clearest photo, I'll admit. And I am actually amazed what one can determine when one closely studies inscriptions. There was no date discernible on this one but the full name is nice.

11 December 2014

Treasure Chest Thursday: Joseph Myers and Rose Adler Marriage

Joseph Myers, the son of David and Ida Myers, was my great grandmother Sarah's brother.[1] He became an immigrant from Labun, Russian Empire, in 1906, joining his elder brothers, Myer and Louis, in New York City.[2]
Kings County, New York, marriage certificate no. 5484, Joseph Myers and Rose Adler (25 March 1913), Municipal Archives, New York City
[1st page]
Groom: Joseph Myers
Residence: 136 Rivington St.
Age: 24
Color: White
Single, Widowed or Divorced: single
Occupation: Glazier
Birthplace: Wolina Russia
Father's Name: David
Mother's Maiden Name: Ida Kestelman
Number of Groom's Marriage: first

Bride: Rose Adler
Residence:
136 Rivington St.
Age: 21
Color: White
Single, Widowed or Divorced: single
Maiden Name, if a Widow: [blank]
Birthplace: Wolina Russia
Father's Name: Isidor
Mother's Maiden Name: Sarah Mendel
Number of Bride's Marriage: first

I hearby certify that the above-named groom and bride were joined in Marriage by me, in accordance with the laws of the State of New York, at 73 Ellen st. NY, in the borough of New York, City of New York, this 25th of March, 1913.

Signature of person performing the ceremony:
                                                        /s/ I. Ehrlichman
Official Station: [blank]
Residence: 551 Grand St., N.Y.

Witnesses to }  B. Bogoslawsky
the Marriage }  Ike Rosenthal
 
[2nd page]  
WE hereby certify that we are the Groom and Bride named in this Certificate, and that the information given therein is correct, to the best of our knowledge and belief.

                              /s/ Joseph Myers  Groom
                              /s/ Rose Adler Bride  

Signed in the presence of  /s/ Barnett Bogoslawsky
                                                /s/  Ike Rosenthal


Notes:
1. Sarah Myers Morris was my great grandmother. Her daughter, Dora Morris Garber, was my paternal grandmother. 
 2. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 19 June 2009), manifest, Batavia, Hamburg to New York, arriving 16 November 1906, p. 18, line 10, Jossel Malzmann; citing National Archives Microfilm Serial T715, Roll 798.

09 December 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: ...l offspring of Aizik Mendel

In June of 2013 I had the pleasure of visiting Ukraine and Labun (now Yurovshchina; once called Lubin in Yiddish), my paternal grandparents' community. We were able to visit the old Jewish cemetery, which I discussed in an earlier post. Over the next several Tuesdays I will post photos and translations (as I am able to decipher) of tombstones from that cemetery. Most do not feature surnames.

Several people participating on "Tracing the Tribe" FaceBook page have worked together to try to decipher this tombstone. Unfortunately the first name - likely on the sixth line from the bottom - has not been determined. A couple of people thought the name could be Doniel (and I agree that there appears to be an alef followed by a lamed at the end of the name), but I think the word "bat" might be at the end of that line (in which case the deceased would have been a woman). And I am not sure if the name starts with resh or daled. 

The date, located at the end of the fourth line from the bottom (after Mendel) seems to have two digits starting with the letter representing 20. I cannot make out the second digit. 

So, what we have, thus far, is:

D/R...l daughter[?] of
Aisik
Mendel 2[#?]
Nisan, in the year
5687
May his/her soul be bound in eternal life 

The 20th of Nisan 5687 would convert to 22 April 1927. The 29th of Nisan would have been 1 May 1927. So, the date of death is something between those two possibilities.

I have been asked why I did not clean the tombstone before taking the photo and why I did not record the text while I was there so that there would be no (or less) confusion in doing these translations. While I tried to make sure that the most moss-obscured letters were clearer, I was operating under the notion of do no harm - and all I had that might have been used to scrape off moss was a credit card.

In retrospect, I suppose I should have spent the evening trying to translate from the digital photos I'd taken that day and then gone back the next day for any I could not decipher. But, really, the mosquitos in the cemetery were carrying me away; I was crawling through mud to take the photos; and there was a local waiting for me who, through the goodness of his heart, was going to take us to some other local points of interest (especially the site in the nearby forest where the Jewish town's people had been murdered in 1941).

I tried during my trip to be flexible and open to changes in plans as opportunities presented themselves. That was an excellent strategy and one I would recommend to anyone doing a similar roots trip. Considering the state of this cemetery: on the side of a hill, in clay soil and overgrown with trees, I'm not unhappy with the results. Guess I'll just have to go back soon, better prepared for the state of this cemetery. 

25 November 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Tzeitel bat Elimelech, Labun Jewish cemetery

In June of 2013 I had the pleasure of visiting Ukraine and Labun (now Yurovshchina; once called Lubin in Yiddish), my paternal grandparents' community. We were able to visit the old Jewish cemetery, which I discussed in an earlier post. Over the next several Tuesdays I will post photos and translations (as I am able to decipher) of tombstones from that cemetery. Most do not feature surnames.
Here lies
honest, aged, 
esteemed Tzeitel
daughter of Elimelech
22nd day in the month of
Iyar 1927
May her soul be bound in everlasting life

As usual, some of this translation has required  interpretation. I believe that the engraver may have run out of room on the third to last line and placed the last letter of the word לחודש (in the month of) on the next line. The shin (ש) then runs into the name of the month (איר) on the second to last line.

The 22nd day of Iyar would have fallen on 24 May in 1927.

I had some help deciphering some of the Hebrew letters from participants on Tracing the Tribe FaceBook page. Translation mistakes are my own [After initially posting this article, I have made some corrections to the original translation thanks to input from Israel Pickholtz.].

21 November 2014

Beware of Black Friday, 5 December 2014

I've a new definition for Black Friday: FamilySearch.org is discontinuing photoduplication services on Friday, 5 December 2014.* They say that with digitization going full-force and new partnerships forming, they no longer need to provide this service. I am crushed.

I will admit that not only have I been an excellent customer - ordering lots of copies even when they used to cost me the princely sum of $2/document - I probably was also a one-woman marketing team for them when I posted in January 2013 about the advent of free document photoduplication. [Well, perhaps they didn't really want that type of marketing.  :-/ ]

One personal research project, for which I am quite proud, involved acquiring many (read: "oodles" of) vital records to document and solve some problems regarding the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association landsmanshaft and burial society community in Montefiore Cemetery in Queens and Beth Moses Cemetery on Long Island, New York. Without FamilySearch I would not have been able to acquire all the records needed to analyze 66 immigrants (Friends, Acquaintances and Neighbors) interred in the cemetery plots. I have published this research in Avotaynu and presented on it at the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies conferences in Boston (2013) and Salt Lake City (2014). I am beholden to FamilySearch.

FamilySearch does so much for so many that I do not like to criticize. I think, however that this decision is a bit premature. While they have made huge strides in digitization in the last few years and have positioned themselves to complete their digitization effort in about ten years, that's still ten years (!). I don't usually look for conspiracies, but I wonder if this wasn't a decision included as part of some of the recent partnership agreements. Surely, these types of completely free resources could not sit well with those partners who make money from providing records.

I suppose I might feel better (at least temporarily) if my nearby Mesa FamilySearch Library was going to be open during the next month or so, but they have their own plans for completely closing from 24 November through 3 January for renovations. What's an intrepid genealogist to do? Shop?!

Goodbye, Photoduplication Department! It was sweet while it lasted.
-------------------------------
* Special thanks to Sheryl Stern Levin who brought this to my attention when she posted about this on the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia FaceBook page.

04 November 2014

Tombstone Tuesday: Khana Genendel Reznik, Labun Jewish cemetery

In June of 2013 I had the pleasure of visiting Ukraine and Labun (now Yurovshchina; once called Lubin in Yiddish), my paternal grandparents' community. We were able to visit the old Jewish cemetery, which I discussed in an earlier post. Over the next several Tuesdays I will post photos and translations (as I am able to decipher) of tombstones from that cemetery. Most do not feature surnames.

This is one of the few tombstones in this cemetery that includes a surname. The name K.G. Reznik is rendered in Cyrillic text. The remainder of the tombstone is in Hebrew characters. 
  
Died 19 Sivan 5695
an elderly innocent woman
Khana Genendel
daughter of Tsvi
K.G. Reznik
1935
May her soul be bound in eternal life 

This is an interesting case where comparing the Hebrew year and the year written in our Hindu-Arabic numeral system can help with interpretation of inscriptions that are difficult to read. I had been unsure of whether the year written under K.G. Reznik was 1925 or 1935. But, the first three numbers of the year written in Hebrew on the uppermost (curved line) are clearly 569[?]. This would convert to 193[?] in the Gregorian calendar. So, the year of death was 1935. 

In addition, I could not determine whether the last numeral in the Hebrew year was a daled (indicating ד ,4) or a hay (5, ה). Since 5 is clearly the last numeral in the Hindu-Arabic written year, we can be assured that the last letter of the Hebrew year is hay (5). 

So, the Hebrew date on the tombstone is 19 Sivan 5695. The date converts to 20 June 1935 in the Gregorian calendar.

Once again my work on translating/transliterating/interpreting a tombstone has benefited from several generous researchers who posted responses to my query on Tracing the Tribe FaceBook page: Deb Morgen Stern, Elan Caspi, Lara Diamond, Phyllis Werlin, Sally Mizroch, Ira Leviton and Mandy Blumstein Van Ostran.

02 November 2014

Join me for "The Jewish Connection: Myth or Reality," 12 Nov 2014

I am excited about my next genealogy research public speaking opportunity. I will be speaking at the Mesa FamilySearch Training Center (464 E. 1st Avenue, Mesa, AZ) at 7 P.M. (Arizona time) on Wednesday, 12 November 2014, giving a talk called, "The Jewish Connection: Myth or Reality." This family history  presentation will be geared for those who may not be Jewish, but who believe they might have some Jewish ancestry. 

For me, the exciting part, aside from creating a new presentation and reaching out to a new audience, is that this presentation will be offered simultaneously as a webinar (for those of you who cannot attend in person) and also recorded for later viewing as a webcast.

If you wish to attend in person (I'd like to meet you!), note that the venue (464 E. 1st Avenue, Mesa, AZ) is in a building one block west of the Mesa Arizona FamilySearch Library.

If you wish to watch live, check out this link: http://www.mesarfhc.org/Webinar.html

If you cannot clear your schedule for this event, consider watching later when the recorded presentation is loaded onto the webcast page.

And while you on that page, note that the Mesa FamilySearch Library has been recording knowledgeable genealogists' presentations for a couple of years and has a nice selection available for your learning pleasure.

30 October 2014

Treasure Chest Thursday: Esther Morris & Robert Blatt Marriage Certificate

Esther Morris, my great aunt and youngest sister of my paternal grandmother Dora, married Robert Blatt in 1929.
New York County, New York, Certificate and Record of Marriage no. 24784 (29 September 1929), Robert Blatt and Esther Morris, Municipal Archives, New York.





Items in red will be discussed further, below. 

[1st page]
Groom: Robert Blatt
Residence: 61 E. 108th Street
Age: 32
Color: White
Single, Widowed or Divorced: single
Occupation: Sheet Metal
Birthplace: Russia
Father's Name: Joseph
Mother's Maiden Name: Leah Levine
Number of Groom's Marriage: First

Bride: Esther Morris
Residence:
239 E. 105th St.
Age: 23
Color: White
Single, Widowed or Divorced: single
Maiden Name, if a Widow: [blank]
Birthplace: Russia
Father's Name: Isidore
Mother's Maiden Name: Sarah Meyers
Number of Bride's Marriage: First
 

I hearby certify that the above-named groom and bride were joined in Marriage by me, in accordance with the laws of the State of New York, at 50 Delancey Street, in the borough of Man, City of New York, this 29th of Sept, 1929.
 

Signature of person performing the ceremony:
                                                        /s/ Rev. I. Kirschner

Official Station: 1835 University Ave
Residence: 1905 Loring Rd, Bx.

Witnesses to }  David Kirschner
the Marriage }  F[?] H[?] Richter
 

[2nd page]  
WE hereby certify that we are the Groom and Bride named in this Certificate, and that the information given therein is correct, to the best of our knowledge and belief.
                              /s/ Robert Blatt  Groom
                              /s/ Esther Morris Bride  

Signed in the presence of  /s/ David Kirschner
                                                /s/         Richter
----------------------- 
Esther and Robert Blatt were married at 50 Delancey Street, which today, is a restaurant supply company (photo from Google Maps, below). I have searched several online New York City directories, but have not determined what was on this corner in 1929.

Isaac Kirschner was a Cantor (and Rabbi) who served at the Hebrew Institute of University Heights, at that time located at 1835 University Avenue. The synagogue building today is occupied by the Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club, shown below.

I am do not know anything about the witnesses who signed the certificate. According to the 1930 U.S. Census, Isaac Kirschner had a son named David, but he would have only been about 9 years old at the time of the wedding, so I doubt that the signature belonged to him. Interestingly, I have a copy of Esther and Robert's ketubah (Jewish marriage record) and the witness on that was Max Garber (my great uncle - and Esther's first cousin).